1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Kidney response time. Help needed.

Discussion in 'Science' started by doublehelix, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. On Monday we ate having some INSET in which we will hear about how drinking water improves concentration etc. I am very dubious. Apart from anything else, blood concentration is closely monitored and controlled by ADH and other hormones. So drinking water will have, at best, a temporary effect on blood concentration. However, just how quickly does this hormone control operate? If I were to drink a glass of water now, for how long would my blood be diluted? Are we talking about seconds or minutes or hours?
    Can anyone steer me in the right direction?
    Just for the record, my best guess is that blood concentration would be back to normal within a couple of minutes. But I'd like to be able to prove this.
     
  2. On Monday we ate having some INSET in which we will hear about how drinking water improves concentration etc. I am very dubious. Apart from anything else, blood concentration is closely monitored and controlled by ADH and other hormones. So drinking water will have, at best, a temporary effect on blood concentration. However, just how quickly does this hormone control operate? If I were to drink a glass of water now, for how long would my blood be diluted? Are we talking about seconds or minutes or hours?
    Can anyone steer me in the right direction?
    Just for the record, my best guess is that blood concentration would be back to normal within a couple of minutes. But I'd like to be able to prove this.
     
  3. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    WHAT?
    Someone is being paid to talk about that?
    I despair.
    FWIW when I was at school we had a drink at home during breakfast, water from the fountain at break, a glass of water with lunch then nothing until we went home. Every one of us managed to concentrate most of the time.
    This water stuff is a load of nonsense really. We get water from EVERYTHING we eat and drink and liquid water is a very small part of most people's water consumption. Even the government admit the 2 litres a day advice has no scientific backing............it's just a figure dreamed up to make people drink more water (aka the nanny state strikes again).
    Water toxicity can be a problem too. Death can occur by drinking 4 litres of water in under 2 hours. There are cases recorded every year.
    I am speechless that any school is wasting money on this sort of INSET. From the teacher/pupil point of view all water bottles means is disruption to lessons filling them and more disruption going to the loo.
    I doubt drinking water has any effect on concentration levels unless one is wither:
    a) seriously dehydrated and gasping for a drink or
    b) seriously hydrated and desperate for the loo
    I'd question your SMT for organising such a waste of time as this.
    Oh, and yes, blood concentration is contstantly kept in check by ADH amongst other things and a glass of water will not turn you into a member of MENSA within minutes of drinking it.
     
  4. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    There's no real answer to this as hydration is an ongoing dynamic situation.
    http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v57/n2s/full/1601895a.html
    The link might help.
     
  5. Do your research & you will be able to challenge the INSETTERS with scienctific evidence if they start making unsupported & unsubstantiated claims. Having said this, maybe they will produce a bibliography referencing the papers & studies that have addressed this issue (including the ones that they don't agree with) so you can all make an informed decision yourselves.
    There is one way in which I think drinking water may help concentration and I say this warily since I have no evidence (just anecdotal & that does not count!). The simple act of changing activity or taking a mini-break from one activity seems to aid concentration for subsequent ones.
    However, it is not the fact that you are drinking water, it is simply the fact that you have 'switched off' from something & then 'switch on' later. Taking a walk, doing a few press-ups, singing a song..... any of these would serve the same purpose.
    I would venture that additional water may actually reduce concentration in some pupils since towards the end of the lesson or the end of the day they may be jiggling about in their seats with only one thought in their heads 'getting to the loo on time'. If they are allowed to leave lessons for visits to the loo then they lose contact time and start having impromptu meetings in corridors & toilets as they all wander around 'going to the toilets'.
    Then there's the problem of more pupils needing to use the toilets at lunch & break times.... sounds like a recipe for lots of late arrivals in class.
    Take what the INSETTERS say with a pinch of salt & report back here (please) if you have the time - I'd be interested to know what their message was.
    It seems an assumption has been made that your pupils are not getting
    enough water in their normal diets. Is there evidence for this?


     
  6. Thanks, BelleDuJour for the link. Nothing which specifically answers my question but interesting and relevant.
    I've now spoken to a recently qualified doctor (PhD and Medical) who reckons that the hormone/kidney control mechanism will act within seconds. Basically, as fast as water is absorbed into the blood stream it wil be be removed by the kidney.
    But the INSET-deliverer is being paid more than me so he/she will know better.
     
  7. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    [​IMG]
    Do come back and terll us what nonsense he/she tells you. And do try to keep a straight face!
     
  8. I caught part of 'Bang goes the theory' on Monday (?). They were doing experiments to prove that you need to be hydrated to concentrate properly. Might be worth a look - I'm not convinced they always get their science 'right'.
     
  9. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    The thing is, how do we know when we are hydrated? We know when we are thirsty (dehydrated), and when over hydrated (needing a pee), but where is the happy balance when we can concentrate on work and not needing a drink or a pee, both of which will distract!
     

Share This Page