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Key Stage Two National Curriculum Tests May 2013 (SATs 2013)

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Tiggermet, May 12, 2013.

  1. zugthebug

    zugthebug New commenter

    Didnt like last question on b. think it was easy to miss the information to work the answer
     
  2. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    I suspect many did miss the information, possibly at the end of a tiring week of tests, but I'm not sure I agree that it was easy to miss it. It was plainly there underneath each one. Finding all of the available information to tackle a problem is one of the skills necessary for problem solving, after all.

    Using all of the information to hand, it wasn't a hard question for a L5 pupil.




     
  3. In terms of the level 3-5 mathematics papers, test A seemed considerably less challenging more straight forward. All round, paper A had a better mix of questions. The level 4 questions in the middle of the paper seemed relatively quick and painless for most of my students.

    I agree with the concensus of opinion on mental maths; it was a good one, fairly easy. The question on estimating the capacity of the mug was a bit random and unconventional, but surely everyone would have got that, right?

    However, it seemed too good to be true, the kids found paper B by far the more challenging paper, with a few questions in the middle which held them up, meaning a handful of students didn't complete the paper (always a shame to lose marks that way).

    Overall, not a bad year for maths, I imagine the scores will even themselves out, thresholds should be fairly typical, around 47-78 for a level 4, 79 and above for a 5.
     
  4. Ok Thanks.

    It was just that a couple of my group said at the end that they couldn't find it and couldn't remember how to do the calculation. It was the first time the school has entered any children for L6 and there were one or two that were borderline but they were keen to try.
     
  5. sparklyflipflops

    sparklyflipflops New commenter

    I would have thought if there was an error in the test, the administrator should be able to take the decision to inform the children. In terms of what the person above said, perhaps this was too specific, but is it actually wrong to inform the children that there is an error? Perhaps it should have been phrased, 'pick the most sensible answer', but even so they did not actually 'help' the children.

    We noticed the inaccuracy when my boy with Asperger's was insistent that the closest answer he could get was 0.2 away and became fixated with this! We then checked several times to make sure. All the other children (who had been used to spotting slight errors in the Abacus scheme) had used their common sense to figure it out anyway!
     
  6. sparklyflipflops

    sparklyflipflops New commenter

    The above was in response to some discussion on the previous page. Attempted to include the post in my reply but failed. Sorry if confusing!!
     
  7. sparklyflipflops

    sparklyflipflops New commenter



    Agreed! Formula not needed. Just bog standard knowledge relating to something I probably should not discuss (as apparentely the tests are still 'live' - this must be a new thing!) and a bit of common sense

    :)
     
  8. sparklyflipflops

    sparklyflipflops New commenter



    Ditto! It was my boy with Asperger's who drew it to our attention. Could not let it go. 'The closest I can get is exactly 0.2mm away'!
     
  9. sparklyflipflops

    sparklyflipflops New commenter

    Is this new?! It used to be that is children were ill they came in & took them in a separate room, were kept away from other children and did them later in the day (if feeling better) or did them at home with an administrator. Was not aware they were allowed to take them the day after! Correct me if I am wrong. Would be helpful to know this for the future.
     
  10. sparklyflipflops

    sparklyflipflops New commenter

     
  11. I don't think it was the first time that a measuring line question had been slightly inaccurate. It would be easier not to include questions that rely so heavily upon correct printing and copying of the test paper.

    Level 6 paper 1 fairly easy, paper 2 more difficult. EAL child struggled with some of the wording (in particular with the food question).
     
  12. "Is this new?! It used to be that is children were ill they came in & took them in a separate room, were kept away from other children and did them later in the day (if feeling better) or did them at home with an administrator. If they couldn't do any of those things, they missed out and the school suffered! Was not aware they were allowed to take them even a day, let alone up until a week after! Correct me if I am wrong. Would be helpful to know this for the future. "



    You have to phone and apply for a timetable variation but keep children separate from those who have already taken tests.
     
  13. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    My LA children found the measure question easy in that they just assumed it was .5 for each and so used that, my highest ability was nearly in tears because he couldn't "do it properly" I just had to say "put down what you think they mean" and left it at that!
     
  14. sparklyflipflops

    sparklyflipflops New commenter

    Ok thanks! :)

    So I guess they're mainly talking about children in hospital, as it would be pretty much impossible to keep children from talking to any of their friends for up to a week after.
     
  15. smee_42

    smee_42 New commenter


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    <td class="post-author-user-cell fiji-post-author-user-cell evolution2-post-author-user-cell ">
    sparklyflipflops
    23-6-2011[/URL]


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    I would have thought if there was an error in the test, the administrator should be able to take the decision to inform the children. In terms of what the person above said, perhaps this was too specific, but is it actually wrong to inform the children that there is an error? Perhaps it should have been phrased, 'pick the most sensible answer', but even so they did not actually 'help' the children.
    We noticed the inaccuracy when my boy with Asperger's was insistent that the closest answer he could get was 0.2 away and became fixated with this! We then checked several times to make sure. All the other children (who had been used to spotting slight errors in the Abacus scheme) had used their common sense to figure it out anyway!




    Exactly. What the administrator actually said was something along the lines
    of "we agree that the measurements are not totally accurate but just do what
    you would normally do". Ie: use your common sense!!! Lots of our higher
    ability children were putting their hands up to complain about the question,
    I'd of been disappointed if they hadn't. If there is an error she was well within
    her rights to say.
     
  16. smee_42

    smee_42 New commenter

    Agree with all of that max. The one question I really couldn't believe the simplicity of was the area question!
     
  17. s1oux

    s1oux New commenter

    Agree about the area question - though actually half my class wanted that read to them, including the Level 5s. I think they thought there MUST be something more to it they were missing.
     
  18. smee_42

    smee_42 New commenter

    Yeah I got the impression some were thinking; "it can't be that easy!" I thought the level 6 test was quite fair. I regret not putting one or two more in for it now to be honest.
     
  19. HSX

    HSX Occasional commenter

    The measuring question was fine for us. Can't see your problems. All measuring equipment has a degree of margin of error inherent in them anyway. The thing is being able to use them and account for that fact. A rounded mathematician should be fine with it. The questions overall were ok - some tricky ways of putting things, but again nothing too taxing. The one question mine stumbled over wasn't through lack of maths skills, but through reading skills. In fact I'm surprised that the wire one hasn't been mentioned but I do believe that you'll see many a mistake made there once you receive the papers back.
     
  20. HSX

    HSX Occasional commenter

    Also, I have a gripe about the mental test. There was a ridiculous 15 second question there. Guess which one I mean... and it's ridiculous because that amount of time was unnecessarily long.
     

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