1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Key religious festivals

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by Pumpkin pie, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. Hi, I'm not sure if I'm asking in the right place but I'll ask anyway! I'd really like my school to more actively celebrate key religious festivals but I'm struggling which festivals to choose for some of the religions. Apart from Christianity where we celebrate 2 festivals, we are looking to choose one festival for the other religions. This is what I have so far:
    Christian - Christmas and Easter
    Islam - Eid al Adha (Nov 7th - ish?)
    Hindu - Diwali (26th Oct) - or is Holi the main one?Please could someone tell me the main festivals for Judaism (Hannuka??), Sikhism (birthday of Guru Nanak?) and Buddhism (Wesak?) and the dates if possible.
    Also, would the Chinese New Year fit in with this?
    Many thanks
    PP
     
  2. Hi, I'm not sure if I'm asking in the right place but I'll ask anyway! I'd really like my school to more actively celebrate key religious festivals but I'm struggling which festivals to choose for some of the religions. Apart from Christianity where we celebrate 2 festivals, we are looking to choose one festival for the other religions. This is what I have so far:
    Christian - Christmas and Easter
    Islam - Eid al Adha (Nov 7th - ish?)
    Hindu - Diwali (26th Oct) - or is Holi the main one?Please could someone tell me the main festivals for Judaism (Hannuka??), Sikhism (birthday of Guru Nanak?) and Buddhism (Wesak?) and the dates if possible.
    Also, would the Chinese New Year fit in with this?
    Many thanks
    PP
     
  3. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    A quick look at the BBC link given here shows that it gives an overview of many religions, not just the main 6.


    Its too late for me to create a nice resource on all of them tonight, but I will try to get round to it. For now I am just uploading some info about Hindu festivals. The BBC site had a surprising ommission in the info they gave. So I looked it up on a couple of other sites and added info about it on my resource. DURGA PUJA! In Bengal it is bigger than Diwali.


    Incidentally, if you are just choosing one festival, go for Navaratri (DurgaPuja) or Diwali as these are the most widely celebrated from what I have seen - and with Diwali you encounter the whole Ramayana Saga.


    Another to consider would be Krishna's birthday which introduces the Mahabarata and Gita.
     
  4. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    For Sikhism I would choose Vaisakki, rather than Guru Nanak's birthday if you can only cover one. Everyone knows what birthdays are about and they are important - especially Guru Nanaks - but it is Vaisakki which gave the Sikh religion much of its character and strength.


    Hey you Sikhs out there, would you agree?


    Then for Islam I would choose Ramadan over any other festival.


    Hey you Muslims out there, would you agree?
     
  5. Can I just ask what you mean by actively celebrate? Just wondering about appropriateness for some pupils.
     
  6. I assume the original question is from a primary school (otherwise there would be an RE department which could answer) and consequently envisage the "celebration" taking place in assembly with perhaps display or some other type of class work woven in to support it. I can see no reason why this would not be appropriate for all pupils. Some JW parents remove children from collective worship but this is increasingly rare. I don't think anyone is suggesting pupils celebrate the festival in the way followers of the tradition do but rather celebrate diversity through understanding the festivals of others.

    Rather than picking out the most important festivals, you could do it thematically by looking at the year, spring festivals such as Easter, festivals of light such as Christmas in the winter and harvest festivals in the autumn. Some dates such as March 20th/21st are important across a spectrum of faiths, Naw Ruz for Baha'is and Zoroastrians, Spring equinox for Pagans. You could weave it in to Black History, Gay/Lesbian History and Gypsy, Roma, Traveller History months.

    Your SACRE should be able to help, there are two things to watch out for, not everybody that belongs to a religion will necessarily participate in all festival, milad ul nabi for example is important in some parts of the Muslim world but not others (just as Shrove Tuesday is bigger in New Orleans than Wigan) and unless you have a determination your collective worship should be "broadly Christian" so if you use assembly time make sure Christian celebrations are well represented. You could weave in some secular festivals such as Trafalgar day or semi secular ones like St Georges (questions to raise about the relationship between church and state for citizenship/RE)
     
  7. Hi all, thank you so much for all your advice and ideas - all very helpful.
    We are indeed a primary school and I suppose when I say 'actively celebrate', I actually mean raise the profile of and develop a greater awareness. We don't have any JW children but all our ch are muslim, so I'm fully aware of how a sensible and sensitive approach is needed while at the same time reflecting our Christian ethos.
    I hope to invite members of other faiths into school to talk to the children about such special days and how they are celebrated. I like the idea of having a display too.
    Thanks again!
     

Share This Page