1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Just started a new post and feeling out of my depth... did you feel like this?

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by whenskiesaregrey, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. I have just started a new post in a large mainstream school, in the Learning Support Dept. I will be assisting statemented children in mainstream classes. All my experience is in a special needs environment, at primary age, and mainly 1:1. I am used to using an adapted curriculum, not trying to get a child through a mainstream lesson in one piece. After my first week, I feel considerably out of my depth.

    I'm not used to having to 'fire fight' all over the classroom, my experience is more focused on the child needing extra support. I feel I have the patienceand experience to support these children, but I don't necessarily know what to do when a group of NT children are playing up, and specifically, winding up the child with SN.

    Please reassure me I can overcome this?! Any hints/tips would be hugely appreciated!
     
  2. I have just started a new post in a large mainstream school, in the Learning Support Dept. I will be assisting statemented children in mainstream classes. All my experience is in a special needs environment, at primary age, and mainly 1:1. I am used to using an adapted curriculum, not trying to get a child through a mainstream lesson in one piece. After my first week, I feel considerably out of my depth.

    I'm not used to having to 'fire fight' all over the classroom, my experience is more focused on the child needing extra support. I feel I have the patienceand experience to support these children, but I don't necessarily know what to do when a group of NT children are playing up, and specifically, winding up the child with SN.

    Please reassure me I can overcome this?! Any hints/tips would be hugely appreciated!
     
  3. 12 years ago I went the opposite way (supporting 1:1 in mainstream to fully special needs), My first day I panicked that I wouldn't cope, the staff were doing strange things with their hands (makaton) the pupils though lovely, were a handful and I managed to lose one! It gets better, give yourself time to settle into the new post, ask for help of staff (and pupils) if something crops up you are unsure of, you shouldn't be expected to know everything straight away. Soon it will be as comfortable as your old job, good luck and enjoy it (and remember you got through the interview so they saw something in you they liked).
     
  4. Thank you for the reassurance! I hope it does come with time, but its what to do in the meantime. It seems like a lot of the time and effort is taken up stopping the NT kids from antagonising the SN child, which I'm obviously not used to coming from a SN background. And how do you get to build a relationship with the child when you are moving from class to class, child to child? I'm sure I'm over-worrying here, but I do feel a bit lost!
     
  5. Make sure you understand the discipline procedure of the school and stick to it. I have used for many years the three F's, friendly , firm and fair. Make sure you use, and the pupils understand, that you are correcting the pupils behaviour and not the pupil. Good luck and give yourself time to settle in.
     
  6. I do the same job, and had the same problem when i started. Re the NT students - a previous post is right when they said find out what the discipline procedure is for the school and use it, firmly. Take on the premise that you are there for all the students, not just your 'named' student and teaching them how to behave is important. Throw a mirror up to them about how rudely they are behaving. Re- Building relationships with students when you may only see them weekly, this takes time. It is helpful if you are seen as 'the class' TA, you can then hover just a bit more around them and watch/wait for indication that they need a hand. You could also just ask them "I am here partly for you, how can i best help you" that can work . Chat to the other TA's, they may know your 'named' children and can suggest strategies, they will almost certainly know the playing up students too - a 'moan-bonding' opportunity there!. Get the teacher to back you up if you are being ignored by messing about students. It does take time to settle in, Secondary schools are huge, busy, complicated places - but you will get used to it, and the students will stop looking scary and nameless and will start smiling at you and asking for your help or approval before you know it. Hang in there!
     

Share This Page