1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Just completed PGCE haven't got job yet - Wondering what to do

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by heva159, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. Hi everyone
    I have just completed my PGCE and haven't been able to maintain getting hold of a NQT job for this September I have been to a number of interviews and the feedback has been great and my application and cover letter seem to be working. I have signed up to loads of agencies for September and hopefully something will come of those. I am just wondering if anyone is in a similar position and struggling to find a job and if anyone has got any suggestions, as do I need more experience or do something different to maintain a NQT post in school.

    Thanks
    H
     
  2. Hi everyone
    I have just completed my PGCE and haven't been able to maintain getting hold of a NQT job for this September I have been to a number of interviews and the feedback has been great and my application and cover letter seem to be working. I have signed up to loads of agencies for September and hopefully something will come of those. I am just wondering if anyone is in a similar position and struggling to find a job and if anyone has got any suggestions, as do I need more experience or do something different to maintain a NQT post in school.

    Thanks
    H
     
  3. Firstly I suggest looking up the meaning of the word 'maintain'.

    If you have a look around the forums you will find there are a lot of people in the same position as yourself.
     
  4. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    How friendly!
    Unfortunately they are right, LOADS of people are in the same boat! I know it doesn't help but its not because you're not good enough there just isn't enough jobs. x

     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I wouldn't want to be thought of as unfriendly or horrible, but your English isn't really good enough to get you a post if what you have written here is a reasonable example.
    You have used words incorrectly more than once, which does suggest it is English not typing that is the problem. this coupled with the grammatical errors will cause you problems. I know this isn't what you want to read, but it is the case.

    We advertised for September for NQTs and got fifty or so applicants, despite being very near the end of term. With so many excellent applications to choose from, any that were hard to read or suggested that the teacher would struggle teaching literacy correctly were binned in no time.

    Other than that, it is hard to see what else you can do. We don't know what you have done already, what your application looks like, what sort of extra curricula things you can offer, how well or not you interview, etc, etc. However, if you are primary then there are just too many teachers for too many jobs.
     
  6. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    How about if the candidate is dyslexic minnieminx? Is that something you check if the literacy isn't good? Or does it go in the bin regardless?
    There are still a few jobs floating around, I know I applied for 2 today... minnieminx is right you do need to check and re check your application and if it is a weakness maybe get someone else to take a look too? Good luck x
     
  7. Sorry did not mean to be unfriendly. I just don't think this person should go through life writing the word maintain when it is the wrong word to use!
     
  8. The headteacher advertising a job won't care if a potential applicant is dyslexic or not. If an application contains easily avoided mistakes then it's likely to be binned.


    I say this as someone who is dyslexic!



    To the OP - the meaning of the word "maintain" aside -it sounds like you're having luck with your application process in that you're getting interviews and good feedback. All I can therefore suggest is perseverance. Hopefully you'll be the right candidate shortly!
     
  9. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Using a word incorrectly several times is not an indication of dyslexia.

    Using incorrect grammar is not an indication of dyslexia either.

    The OP was asking about their application, not ones in general. However if someone cannot use a word processing package to check their mistakes before submitting an application for a teacher in a primary school, then yes their application will go in the bin regardless. If an applicant cannot use correct English themselves, how on earth are they going to help our school raise standards in writing?
     
  10. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    So if a great (non English based subject) teacher applied for a job they'd be culled regardless? I can understand minnieminx saying about primary - obviously if people teach literacy they need to be good at it! But I think its ridiculous how someone who could be excellent in their own subject could be pushed aside so easily. x

     
  11. This is the case for all professional jobs (including teaching). If you have any mistakes in your application form it will go in the bin. If you are dyslexic then it would be a good idea to get the application checked over before sending it off to avoid that happening. It is careless to have mistakes in a job application.
     
  12. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Why? What subject would it not matter whether someone has a decent grasp of English or not? If someone cannot use correct English in a formal application letter, what on earth will they be using when more relaxed and instant in a classroom?
     
  13. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    So someone who had a PhD or was a mathematical genius but whose English writing wasn't perfect wouldn't be an asset? I think we'll have to agree to disagree...
     
  14. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Not if they were unable to communicate in standard English, no they wouldn't. We aren't looking for perfection, just not huge glaring errors. We always look for someone able to teach, which does involve communication.

    That is ok, I might well be wrong!
     
  15. Grammar and spelling mistakes in a job application don't only point to a poor grasp of the English language, something which is important for all teachers in order to communicate ideas effectively. They also show a lazy and careless attitude from an applicant who cannot be bothered to proof read or polish what should be their best work. If I was applying for a job that involved plenty of maths (which incidentally I currently have), I'd be sure to get somebody with a sound grip of the subject to check over any problems I had to solve in the application form. It's about taking pride in yourself and your work and not being so lazy as to not even bother proof reading a personal statement. Maybe this is what is coming across in the OP's interviews that is preventing them from landing a job? Or maybe they really do use words incorrectly more often than they have here, which can be glaringly apparent in face to face contact.
     
  16. OP - I don't think any part of the country has a particular shortage of teachers, but primary and certain secondary subject specialisms are particularly commonin certain areas. I live in a very rural county that has two institutions for ITT, so the market is somewhat flooded! At my college we were told that the North West of England is particularly saturated with teachers. I did supply for a full academic year after my PGCE, applying for jobs all the way through, and was eventually appointed a couple of weeks ago. You're not alone by any means!
     

Share This Page