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Just been inspected under the new framework...

Discussion in 'Ofsted inspections' started by Baggy1980, Sep 19, 2009.

  1. We have just been inspected under the new framework.
    Although the inspectors recognised that the school has moved forward a long way since being in NTI four years ago, we were given a lower grading than we would have done under the old framework.
    Many of the judgements made (for example- Leadership and Management) were held back by the fact that although our outcomes have consistently improved over the last four years, our students still come out with outcomes lower than the national average. Our school serves an area with significant depravation, but the new framework seems to have no mechanism to appreciate this. We seem to have moved away from the notion (admittedly flawed) of judging schools on their value added.
    My advice to any similar schools facing inspection is: expect a tough time!
    Do not expect to be able to get a grade comaprable with the old framework- Oftsted is a new, tougher, beast! Remember this when doing your SEF, and be able to back EVERYTHING up with cold, hard figures.
    Comments are welcome!
    B


     
  2. We have just been inspected under the new framework.
    Although the inspectors recognised that the school has moved forward a long way since being in NTI four years ago, we were given a lower grading than we would have done under the old framework.
    Many of the judgements made (for example- Leadership and Management) were held back by the fact that although our outcomes have consistently improved over the last four years, our students still come out with outcomes lower than the national average. Our school serves an area with significant depravation, but the new framework seems to have no mechanism to appreciate this. We seem to have moved away from the notion (admittedly flawed) of judging schools on their value added.
    My advice to any similar schools facing inspection is: expect a tough time!
    Do not expect to be able to get a grade comaprable with the old framework- Oftsted is a new, tougher, beast! Remember this when doing your SEF, and be able to back EVERYTHING up with cold, hard figures.
    Comments are welcome!
    B


     
  3. When were you inspected prior to this latest one? Was it at about the 3 year gap in between or sooner - was the inspection triggered by time or by results do you think?

    Cheers

    Clive
     
  4. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Having been part of the pilot and received a no notice inspection in May I completely agree. We were pretty mcuh told by our inspectors that had we had an old inspection we would've been outstanding, instead we were good with a couple of outstandings. Things to watch out for - Governance - boy have they upped the ante there and safeguarding - I know a couple of schools who have come unstuck with this one and despite being good in all areas have been put into a category - no flexibility here at all.

    In my last school - where outcomes were good- we were still told we had to get more pupils achieveing level 5 (75%+ from next year) at Y6 -everything is data driven. To be honest I am dreading it in my new school. Outcomes are poor and there's so much to be done. I feel a category coming on!
     
  5. bob79

    bob79 Occasional commenter

    I have mine in two weeks. I wondered what advice you could offer for just a classroom teacher whohas never been inspected before (aside from quitting - as I feel like it!)
     
  6. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Bob, depending on your situation (eg primary,secondary, size of school) it may not be as bad as you think. The teachers in my last school found the whole process fairly straightforward, although they spent A LOT of time in early years (this had been an issue in the last inspection and of course they want to see value for their EYFS cash). The rest were only observed once or twice. In a secondary school I have heard of colleagues who've never even met the inspectors. Be very prepared in lessons, share success criteria and objectives, use AFL strategies and ensure that ALL children understand the lesson and make progress. Doddle! (Just kidding) seriously I remember how anxious I used to get as a teacher. Just teach the best lessons you possibly can and thank God they don't do the week long inspections anymore.
    Good luck. You have a lot of notice by the way, most unusual.
     
  7. They want to see pupil PROGRESS. They aren't interested in you doing all of the singing and dancing, they want to see pupils doing...

    Remember to have a few little AFL tasks to show progress.

    They were only in our lessons for 30 mins, so you need to think about this when planning.

    They want to see lots of differentiation.

    They don't give outstanding easily!

    B
     
  8. Couldn't agree more Curlygirly... they were all over our safeguarding stuff like a rash. They also seemed alot tougher in lesson observation gradings, with many of our very strong staff only coming out with "satisfactory."

    We are a huge secondary, we were inspected under 3 years ago and got "satisfactory" when we came out of NTI.

    We have moved heaven and earth in that time and this time got "Satisfactory with good features." Under the old inspection framework we would have got "Good."

    Bit sickening really!

    B
     
  9. What exactly were they examining so closely with the Safeguarding; your records and training etc?
     
  10. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Single central record has to be the format approved by them, Any errors = fail. They went through all our risk assessments for the last 3 years (hundreds of them) with a fine toothcomb, they asked about staff training - all staff - down to the relief cleaner - had to be trained and had to have signed to say they understood policies and procedures - otherwise it's a fail. All parents crb or list 99 checked otherwise - fail (this included any after school volunteers even if they had nothing to do with the school itself) They wanted to see daily and weekly risk assessments for all EYFS classes (fortunately we had them).Also they asked children about safeguarding issues, even in early years and expected them to be able to give answers about how to stay safe. I have been told by the head of a local school that because 1 parent said her child didn't feel safe in school they were given notice to improve, despite having all good or satisfactory grades elsewhere - safeguarding is a key judgement - if it is inadequate, you go into a category. Basically Ofsted are reacting to the criticism they received over the baby P case.
     
  11. tangerinecat

    tangerinecat New commenter

    OP- ditto. Really tough Ofsted, much more stressful experience - outcome - lower grade than would have done last year.
    Inspection only two years after the last one - we were expecting summer term.
    Three areas automatic fail if you don't comply with everything: safeguarding, attainment and another one (forgotten, so bloody traumatised!). You can be turning cartwheels in the classroom, but if your children are not making their two sub-level progress you are stuffed. Regardless of whether you have a particularly duff cohort, are in a difficult area etc. Frankly, we consider it an achievement if the children are even in school given a lot of their backgrounds, how the hell are we meant to get them to Level 4 when they and their parents have no aspirations?
    Sorry, very cross about the effect three people can have on a school - morale is totally crushed and staff are devastated. Everyone works so hard and cares so much about the kids, but it's all about making Government targets. [​IMG]
     
  12. Following our inspection, have just heard results from two local schools.
    One has been put into NTI, the other scraped satisfactory. Both serve very difficult areas, and both have been crippled by the new framework. One of these schools was "Outstanding" previously!
    If your kids don't come out above average (irrespective of cohort) then you are facing a tough time.
    Agree with tangerinecat about the effect on morale, particularly when you do a good job in difficult circumstances.
    B


     
  13. hi
    were due an inspection anytime now, our 3 years are up in two weeks. I'am the numeracy co-ordinator and we have major issues with attainment in ks1, only 3 children achieved level 3 last year and none the year before. in ks 2 we do well but mainly all the progress is in year 5 and 6, this is what our data shows (value added for the last 3 years has been above 100). 2 out of 3 teachers observed in numeracy this week received inadequate lesson observations by myself and the head. we are not putting actions in place for support.
    can you tell me, did they interview the literacy and numeracy co-ordinators, if so what did they ask. I really want to prepare myself. Also i'm year 6, did the inspectors interview children, look at books, check children know target etc

    thanks
     
  14. tangerinecat

    tangerinecat New commenter

    Yes, they did interview the co-ords for Literacy and Numeracy - it was mostly a grilling over progress and attainment. I don't know the exact questions, but progress/attainment is on of the areas you get an automatic fail.
    What makes me cross is that we didn't quite have enough 'good' teaching (80% or more) to make up for the fact that we have a difficult catchment area and don't reach the national average of Level 4s. However, if we had a good catchment area, where more children have more parental support and stable home lives, the percentage of 'satisfactory' teaching can be higher - in other words, in those catchment areas it's OK if pupils learn despite the teacher, not because of.
    I'm predicting more people leaving the profession, to be honest.

     
  15. It is now statutory to have 75% at level four and above in English( the combined percentage) and maths. Our school was inspected last July. The inspectors had all had their training for new framework, but supposedly using old framework.

    Staff morale has hit the bottom, and all the cards have been thrown in the air. Things that were established, are now being thrown out. No one knows where they stand with consultants, as been warned that if advice taken doesn't work they will wash their hands.

    This is wrong. Good teachers will leave. No one will want to work in inclusive schools. How can children with SEN be expected to hit the national average. We can deliver two levels from KS1 to 2 but not 75% at level four.....as we have over 30% of pupils with SEN.
    Just taking the money for the time being, but no longer as comitted. My family will come first from now on.

     
  16. tangerinecat

    tangerinecat New commenter

    Agreed, bixierocks.
    We do the best we can to make the lessons accessible, fun and relevant for a diverse range of needs (as in any school).
    There is no way we can attain 75% Level 4 - but we can send children into the world who are polite, responsible and are willing to try even when they find something difficult.
    Given a lot of their backgrounds and the way they come into EYFS, we feel this is an achievement that should be celebrated in itself.
    But who cares about the whole child?
    Academic achievement is the be all and end all.
     
  17. poopin meself now.
    Expecting the phonecall anyday soon! Our results weren't great, writing was especially poor! Am expecting to be whacked with a big stick. My school is great, happy kids, very supportive parents etc but fearing the worse due to our small cohort's results.
    Am a bit concerned over the safeguarding, someone mentioned risk assessments for the EYFS- I think I have missed something there! what do you mean?
    Cheers
    'Soon to be looking for a career change.'
     
  18. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    You need to do an overall risk assessment indoors and out for EYFS which needs to be updated regularly - we do ours weekly. Hope this helps.
     
  19. " no more 1-week-long inspections " - how long is it these days ??
    (' was teaching in the UK in the 90s when an Ofsted inspection lasted at least a week)

    Are there unanounced "no-notice inspections" ?
     
  20. What were they looking for when they went through the risk assessments? Ours are all based on generic county ones - hope they pass! Dreading it now!!
     

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