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JOBSEEKERS TIPS

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by WRASTERMAN, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. These forums have been brilliant - they really helped me secure the job I've just been offered: took a bit of trawling through, but there are fantastic gems hidden in so many posts. Special thanks to TheoGriff for his advice.
    Tips I've gathered and found useful:
    1. research - make sure you know as much as you can about your prospective school. Ofsted, press reports, website . . .
    2. answer the job spec: don't use someone else's application form! Look at TheoGriff's advice about creating an executive summary: priceless!
    3. fill in all of the application - don't put 'refer to . . .', don't leave gaps.
    4. structure your statement - reflect what you know about the school. tell them what you could do for them. give examples of things you've done that support your comments. re-read it and try to cut out any unnecessary bits. check your spelling and grammar!! you don't want to leave an impression of you being unable to do this.
    5. if you are offered an interview do your homework. There are tremendous resources in these forums to help - look at the lists of possible questions. Rehearse your replies: it made me feel much calmer on interview thinking that I'd got some idea of what was going to be asked.
    6. you don't have to ask a million questions to impress! target your questioning carefully.
    7. if you're asked to do a presentation, make it unique. Use your strengths to the full - can you do it visually, digitally, verbally, as a role play . . .? Sprinkle it with examples of what you have done that illustrate what you are offering. Be confident with the panel - you spend hours in front of large groups of stroppy teenagers/demanding juniors: this is far more straightforward! And remember you're talking about you - who else is better qualified?
    8. Keep smiling. Be friendly, introduce yourself . . .A positive impression goes a long way!
    9. Remember that another candidate might be the right choice for the school: don't be too downhearted if it's not you. Put it down to experience and keep looking for the right job.
     
  2. These forums have been brilliant - they really helped me secure the job I've just been offered: took a bit of trawling through, but there are fantastic gems hidden in so many posts. Special thanks to TheoGriff for his advice.
    Tips I've gathered and found useful:
    1. research - make sure you know as much as you can about your prospective school. Ofsted, press reports, website . . .
    2. answer the job spec: don't use someone else's application form! Look at TheoGriff's advice about creating an executive summary: priceless!
    3. fill in all of the application - don't put 'refer to . . .', don't leave gaps.
    4. structure your statement - reflect what you know about the school. tell them what you could do for them. give examples of things you've done that support your comments. re-read it and try to cut out any unnecessary bits. check your spelling and grammar!! you don't want to leave an impression of you being unable to do this.
    5. if you are offered an interview do your homework. There are tremendous resources in these forums to help - look at the lists of possible questions. Rehearse your replies: it made me feel much calmer on interview thinking that I'd got some idea of what was going to be asked.
    6. you don't have to ask a million questions to impress! target your questioning carefully.
    7. if you're asked to do a presentation, make it unique. Use your strengths to the full - can you do it visually, digitally, verbally, as a role play . . .? Sprinkle it with examples of what you have done that illustrate what you are offering. Be confident with the panel - you spend hours in front of large groups of stroppy teenagers/demanding juniors: this is far more straightforward! And remember you're talking about you - who else is better qualified?
    8. Keep smiling. Be friendly, introduce yourself . . .A positive impression goes a long way!
    9. Remember that another candidate might be the right choice for the school: don't be too downhearted if it's not you. Put it down to experience and keep looking for the right job.
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    [​IMG] Well 10/10 for synopsis of posts to prioritise important criteria! Will save someone haven't to trawl through lots of posts -though there's virtue in that too, if one has the time!
    Now there's a tradition here of opening a new thread entitled Dear Theo I got the job, which is a real encouragement to others (unless you've just had an interview and not got it) and then you get your own shiny star reward,for which everyone yearns and strives. So do start your own new thread, though congratulations anyway.
     

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