1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Jobs in UAE State Sector

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by licensedtoteach, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. I am a second year teacher for a well-known AD organisation. Appointed originally on a 2-year contract, I work in the primary sector under licence.
    A few things that people should be aware of:
    1. The children have little or no English and even less manners. Teachers are well-remunerated but the job is tough.
    2. If you have no formal EFL training, get some. The levels of English here are poor at best. This also applies in the Grade 12 sectors of the state system here where some fellow Americans work.
    3. Even though we are well-remunerated, it is not a place for teaching couples with children of school age. There is no educational allowance as part of the package.
    4. The governmental body in charge of education is shambolic. The curricula used are unrealistically ambitious in primary and secondary. English, for example, is based on a completely inappropriate 1st Language model. Many of the students are barely literate in their own language, let alone English.
    5. Be especially aware of one primary where Chinese is being taught alongside English and Arabic - and no, I am not joking.
    6. It is likely that the useful support that there has been (in my case anyway) from outside operators is going to be withdrawn across the board. If this happens, expect chaos, particularly in the Cycle 2 (Grades 6-9) and Cycle 3 (Grades 10-12) schools where things are likely to lose direction and focus. Even in schools where operator support has been patchy, they have at least served the purpose of keeping people in line.
    7. Be prepared to sacrifice your professional principles by seriously over-rewarding poor work. As much as the government wants to improve things, the reality is parents expect good marks and the government is reluctant to upset the parents.
    Away from the classroom, life is a joy but the three trimester year is a slog and the holidays are not so great. Again, if you have kids, holidays rarely coincide with those of the international schools where you will have to place them.
    I hope this has been of help. If you need more, please DM me.
     
  2. I am a second year teacher for a well-known AD organisation. Appointed originally on a 2-year contract, I work in the primary sector under licence.
    A few things that people should be aware of:
    1. The children have little or no English and even less manners. Teachers are well-remunerated but the job is tough.
    2. If you have no formal EFL training, get some. The levels of English here are poor at best. This also applies in the Grade 12 sectors of the state system here where some fellow Americans work.
    3. Even though we are well-remunerated, it is not a place for teaching couples with children of school age. There is no educational allowance as part of the package.
    4. The governmental body in charge of education is shambolic. The curricula used are unrealistically ambitious in primary and secondary. English, for example, is based on a completely inappropriate 1st Language model. Many of the students are barely literate in their own language, let alone English.
    5. Be especially aware of one primary where Chinese is being taught alongside English and Arabic - and no, I am not joking.
    6. It is likely that the useful support that there has been (in my case anyway) from outside operators is going to be withdrawn across the board. If this happens, expect chaos, particularly in the Cycle 2 (Grades 6-9) and Cycle 3 (Grades 10-12) schools where things are likely to lose direction and focus. Even in schools where operator support has been patchy, they have at least served the purpose of keeping people in line.
    7. Be prepared to sacrifice your professional principles by seriously over-rewarding poor work. As much as the government wants to improve things, the reality is parents expect good marks and the government is reluctant to upset the parents.
    Away from the classroom, life is a joy but the three trimester year is a slog and the holidays are not so great. Again, if you have kids, holidays rarely coincide with those of the international schools where you will have to place them.
    I hope this has been of help. If you need more, please DM me.
     
  3. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    This is a fairly bleak picture that you have painted, licensedtoteach, but on the whole it confirms what I have heard from a variety of sources. It also explains why so many Emirati parents are desperate to send their children to an "international" school, rather than one run by the government. In fact, the incompetence and sheer stupidity of the government body in charge of education in Abu Dhabi reminds me of its Qatari cousin, the Supreme Education Council of Qatar.
     
  4. I sorry to say but thats the sad reality of the ADEC system at the moment on the ground. On paper it all looks good but there is no support to enable the NSM to take shape. Too much change too quick. At the end of the year most PPP providers will be handing back schools, except a few which will be handed back next year. After that its all going to go down the pan!
     
  5. The words ADEC and control do not belong in same sentence. There will be chaos.
     
  6. try telling ADEC that. It seems that they dont want to know. No offence but they are hiring the wrong type of teachers. Some call them back backer teachers, here and done the next.

    Out of the 450 LT they hired in 2010, 50 or so left in the first term. That was last year. Some even ran off with the allowances they received and never looked back.
     
  7. So we heard last week. I guess for many of us it's time to think of going home, or moving on. Our operator acts as a go-between with the managers at our school. We'd get nothing written in English or explained to us properly if it were not for them. All the forms we sign are in Arabic and we rarely know what the hell it is we are signing for.

    ap4058 also makes a good point. It is true that many LTs are here for the money only. I came looking for something fulfilling but now all I look forward to are the bucks at the end of the month. The kids I teach are little monsters and the local support person just sits back and lets me do everything.

    One fellow LT described us as 'the well-paid hired help.' He was right on the money.
     
  8. Whatever the future might be, it won't be decided on until the last minute. ADEC is to planning what Rush Limbaugh is to weight watchers,
     
  9. As an LT working in Al Gharbia, I heartily agree with all that has been said. Coming here is akin to going down the rabbit hole in Alice in Wonderland! - certainly not for the faint hearted!
     
  10. Some LTs are doing a great job, we have two in our school, but if it wasn't for the operators, they would not have lasted 2 days.

    ADEC on the other hand live on a different plant, they don't even now how many LTs there are in any given school! As they ask the operators to tell them - Great.

    After all the work we have done, we are now going to be shafted, thanks but no thanks is the response from ADEC, now thats the case. out with the operators and in with the fresh new LTs.
     
  11. All the hiring of LTs are done by only one company. This company seems to be hiring teacher from that same region. That very same company doesn't have a clue about teacher and nor do some of the potential recruits that they hire.

    the turn over of LTs are in double figures and for a educational reform programme, someone hasn't clocked on that its not working. Ah but don't tell the sheiks in ADEC that.
     
  12. The above comment is right on the money. It ain't an easy gig.
     

Share This Page