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Jewellery Project ideas...?

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by SDL, Dec 23, 2011.

  1. SDL

    SDL New commenter

    Hi,
    I have contemplated introducing a jewellery project to my Year 9 students to give them a taste of some metal working practices and also to entice some of the girls to opt for Resistant Materials for GCSE next year.
    Problem is I am more of a Graphics specialist and also have very little in the way of metal working facilities i.e. no brazing hearth, torches or lathe. I can purchase some portable butane or propane plumbers torches to get round not having a hearth.
    Could anyone suggest or recommend a project, book, website which will hook some of the girls into RM next year.
    Many thanks
     
  2. SDL

    SDL New commenter

    Hi,
    I have contemplated introducing a jewellery project to my Year 9 students to give them a taste of some metal working practices and also to entice some of the girls to opt for Resistant Materials for GCSE next year.
    Problem is I am more of a Graphics specialist and also have very little in the way of metal working facilities i.e. no brazing hearth, torches or lathe. I can purchase some portable butane or propane plumbers torches to get round not having a hearth.
    Could anyone suggest or recommend a project, book, website which will hook some of the girls into RM next year.
    Many thanks
     
  3. Tatty Devine - goggle. Have you a laser cutter?
     
  4. SDL

    SDL New commenter

    Sadly no laser cutter. Thanks for reply though [​IMG]
     
  5. Our pewter casting unit is based around a computer trolley with two small metalwork vices attached and uses a Basch paint stripper mounted above a ladle. Works brilliantly and we get about two or ththree years out of the hot air guns. Moulds can be made from MDF, plaster of Paris (must be bone dry) even card works!
     
  6. modelmaker

    modelmaker Lead commenter

    Back in the late 60s my brother spent a period as an apprentice jeweller. He gave my mum a Christmas present of a pair of earings he'd made from a couple of half pennies. Some of you won't have seen them, but half pennies in the 60's looked like this on the reverse side:
    [​IMG]
    He started by filing the front side flat, i.e. removing the queen's head. How do you hold the coin to do this? Simple. You tack some panel pinsaround it into a block of wood that you can hold in a vice.
    Next, he pierced around the ship and filed the edges smooth. Then he filed away the detail on the back so all he was left with was a hoop with a ship design inside. He braised a tiny hoop that he'd formed from some brass wire to the top. After he polished it, he silver plated it, fixed a few links of chain and the ear attachment.
    It's illegal to deface a coin of the realm, but unlikely he'd ever be charged over it. Mum got a fantastic and unique present she treasured all her life and apart from his time and very small outlay, the cost of his project amounted to a penny.
    You could do the finishing of something like this by enameling it. Do schools still cover enameling?
    How about this for an idea? I haven't tried it, but I'm pretty sure it would work.
    Get some copper sheet and paint it on both sides. Etch a design into the paint, where you remove the bits you're going to cut away. Very easy to do if you've got a laser, but if you haven't, you can still do it by hand if you're careful. Use the printed circuit etcher to create a defined profile to cut around.
    Resurect planishing. My metalwork teacher sorted this out over 40 years ago by buying a dozen planishing hammers and for anvils used a box of coach bolts he'd polished. Our project was to make teaspoons, back in the days when people drank from loose tea. We had a template for the shape of the spoon to cut out with Gilbows from a piece of copper sheet, clean up with files then beat into the shape of a spoon. Then we enameled it.
    Something my mother loved as well, treasured and used. Come open day, however, we were asked to return our work to be presented and mum refused to allow as it would deprive her of a cup of tea. I would probably have been close to tears at that time, but now it makes me laugh with a good deal of warmth.

     

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