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I've accepted a day's work and have just researched the school - ARGH!

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by Mowgli1970, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. The agency rang me and asked me to work in a school that's a fair distance away, but I said ok. She said they were desperate for somebody which should have rung alarm bells, but still I accepted. I've googled the school and find it's in a really rough catchment with nearly 50% on the SEN register and 35% free school meals.
    I'm going to have a **** day aren't I?
    Any suggestions for ways to engage them/get them on my side?[​IMG]
     
  2. The agency rang me and asked me to work in a school that's a fair distance away, but I said ok. She said they were desperate for somebody which should have rung alarm bells, but still I accepted. I've googled the school and find it's in a really rough catchment with nearly 50% on the SEN register and 35% free school meals.
    I'm going to have a **** day aren't I?
    Any suggestions for ways to engage them/get them on my side?[​IMG]
     
  3. VelvetChalk

    VelvetChalk New commenter

    Its only a day and you may be surprised....I am often called to teach in a school in one of the roughest areas of the west mids with a high instance of SEN/EAL children and I actually love teaching the kids there, especially as theres a lot of support within the school. :)
     
  4. janeygrey

    janeygrey New commenter

    I so agree with this! One of the reasons why I work everyday is often because schools such as these are our bread and butter. Many supplies wouldn't touch them with a barge pole, but believe me, the more you work in such schools, the easier it as as they get to know you and the more the schools will call you back. Enjoy!
     
  5. Hi Mowgi,


    No offense meant, but perhaps the best way to get them on your side is to not prejudge the children, stick them in boxes and believe them to be out to make your day ****. If the majority are from disadvantaged backgrounds their **** day could well make yours seem like a walk in the park ....

    Is it that you have difficulty teaching SEN, or find it hard to empathise with the child on free school meals?
    Or is that as a teacher you are only capable of managing pupils who are of one specific type, the middle class high achievers?????? I think not, you are above that, you are a teacher :)

    The only way to get children really on your side is to believe in them 100%, look them straight in the eye empathise with them over the loss of their teacher for the day, hold your head up, smile and spend 10 minutes getting to know them before the lessons. Lets face it a 10 min question and answer on their favourite film or food or topic, is better than half an hour on trying to settling them. If primary, then a quick run round with names and ages, followed by a short head down thumbs up game usually has most younger pupils eating out of your hand, even year 6.

    Best Wishes and be positive going in, and you may surprise yourself at what a great day you have ;)
     
  6. I worked in a school in a really nice area today. Very few free school meals. Only a couple of SEN. Set work was interesting and easy enough to deliver but with enough freedom for me to enjoy too. But I had one of my worst days because behaviour was appalling. I just couldn't get them onside. I've had that same class before and they weren't that bad before.
    You may have a much better day than you think.
     
  7. Thanks all. I think I posted in a post-phone call panic! You're right, I shouldn't pre-judge them, though I will add that I taught in a communities first school for nearly 20 years so I am well aware of the challenges.
    I enjoy teaching, regardless of ability. It's the low level constant disruptive behaviour that really annoys me. Or the child that is a behavioural nightmare taking up 75% of your time so the well-behaved, willing children miss out.
    Like you say, it's only a day!
    Thanks for replies.
     
  8. One of my favourite schools to go to in terms of the sheer buzz about the place and how desperately the kids want to please you is an infant school in one of the most deprived estates locally, with a massive proportion of SEN kids. Would much rather do a day there with their toughest class (who are sweeties really if you keep on top of them) than some places I've been in very affluent parts of town where the kids have quite a nasty degree of arrogance about them, the staff think they're "it" cos they teach at shiny shiny nice cars on the school run St Shiny's.
    They also tend to be the places where the staff really stick together, where the staffrooms are full of howls of laughter (there are some staffroom conversations that will stay with me till the day I die from the rougher schools in town for their sheer comedy) and where the staff will admit if you leave honest feedback that, yep, little Damien can be an utter blighter and the way he's gone on today is completely normal so don't beat yourself up about it! (Indeed in one place I got left briefing notes for a particularly rough Maths set that, "before you ask, yes they are ALWAYS like this - IT'S NOT JUST YOU!!!!" which I really appreciated 20 seconds into the lesson!
     
  9. Mrs-Pip

    Mrs-Pip New commenter

    If only eveyone was that honest!!! :)
     
  10. Well it was challenging, but the children were obviously desperately needy and damaged. There were 4 full time TAs in a class of 30 to cope with the behaviour!!!
    I didn't do much teaching and there wasn't much marking as they did very little, but according to the TAs it was a good day!
    Fair play, they earned their money today.
     

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