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It's that time of year...

Discussion in 'Personal' started by coffeekid, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. coffeekid

    coffeekid Star commenter

    Pertinent words from Charles Dickens. I love A Christmas Carol, for lots of reasons. Dickens had his faults but at least he had a bit of humanity.

    "They were a boy and a girl. Yellow, meagre, ragged, scowling, wolfish; but prostrate, too, in their humility. Where graceful youth should have filled their features out, and touched them with its freshest tints, a stale and shrivelled hand, like that of age, had pinched, and twisted them, and pulled them into shreds. Where angels might have sat enthroned, devils lurked, and glared out menacing. No change, no degradation, no perversion of humanity, in any grade, through all the mysteries of wonderful creation, has monsters half so horrible and dread.

    Scrooge started back, appalled. Having them shown to him in this way, he tried to say they were fine children, but the words choked themselves, rather than be parties to a lie of such enormous magnitude.

    “Spirit, are they yours?” Scrooge could say no more.

    “They are Man’s,” said the Spirit, looking down upon them. “And they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased. Deny it!” cried the Spirit, stretching out its hand towards the city. “Slander those who tell it ye. Admit it for your factious purposes, and make it worse. And abide the end.”

    “Have they no refuge or resource?” cried Scrooge.

    “Are there no prisons?” said the Spirit, turning on him for the last time with his own words. “Are there no workhouses?”

    The bell struck twelve."
     
  2. Jude Fawley

    Jude Fawley Star commenter

    Our hearts are not carved from the same stone as Wilde's.
     
  3. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    Love the Muppet version
     
    agathamorse, BetterNow and knitone like this.
  4. coffeekid

    coffeekid Star commenter

    Me too!
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  5. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Alistair Sims' version is the best.
     
  6. coffeekid

    coffeekid Star commenter

    Tbh, I can't think of a version I've seen that I dislike.
     
  7. sparkleghirl

    sparkleghirl Star commenter

    if man you be in heart, not adamant, forbear that wicked cant until you have discovered What the surplus is, and Where it is. Will you decide what men shall live, what men shall die. It may be, that in the sight of Heaven, you are more worthless and less fit to live than millions like this poor man's child. Oh God. to hear the Insect on the leaf pronouncing on the too much life among his hungry brothers in the dust.'

    My favourite is the George C Scott one, He makes me feel sorry for Scrooge - lost his mother at birth, and was blamed and resented by his father. Lost his sister and always regretted throwing away the love of his life. No wonder he turned into an old grump.
     
  8. Oscillatingass

    Oscillatingass Star commenter

    Even when he is redeemed following the visits of ghostly spectres he still expects the shops to be open on Christmas day. He sends the boy to the butchers to buy the biggest goose he can find. A Tory through sand through, I'm afraid.
     
    InkyP likes this.
  9. sparkleghirl

    sparkleghirl Star commenter

    It was normal I think, Christmas wasn't always a holiday.
     
  10. Oscillatingass

    Oscillatingass Star commenter

    Just having a lol.:)
     
    coffeekid likes this.
  11. coffeekid

    coffeekid Star commenter

    I saw a documentary about Christmas in Britain that said 25th December wasn't a holiday in Victorian times. As @sparkleghirl said.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  12. Oscillatingass

    Oscillatingass Star commenter

    I just checked. Christmas Day was first made a Bank Holiday in1834 and Dickens wrote his Christmas Masterpiece in 1843. I cant recall if there is anything in the story to suggest it was "set" in a time other than the year it was written. Maybe some shops stayed open even if they didn't have to. After all Scrooge was reluctant to allow his clerk any time off for Christmas Day. Yep, the evidence points to even the redeemed Scrooge being a Tory.
     
  13. sparkleghirl

    sparkleghirl Star commenter

    Bank holidays and public holidays were different things.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  14. Oscillatingass

    Oscillatingass Star commenter

    Honestly, I don't want to get into an argument about this. It was just a throw away remark. I will now withdraw from this with all good wishes.:)
     
  15. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    I've almost finished watching Bleak House.
     
  16. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    When we researched the family history we found several marriage certificates dated 25th December. Back in the day it was the only day some people had off work.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  17. knitone

    knitone Lead commenter

    Our eldest son is reading it to his daughter. She is only 13 months.
     
    coffeekid likes this.
  18. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    When my children were little, we sat in the big chair and I read it to them every day after school as it got towards Christmas. It got to the point where they could quote-along.
    My son asked me just the other day if I'd started reading it to his children yet. No, still a bit young - too many words I'd have to break off and explain. They did however enjoy "Twas The Night Before Christmas".
     
    nizebaby and coffeekid like this.
  19. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    The Thirteen Clocks. You must read it to them in front of the fire while they can't read for themselves.
     
  20. knitone

    knitone Lead commenter

    My mother read it to my siblings and me, I read it to our boys and now my eldest is reading it to his daughter. He says that all of Michael Caine’s best lines are in the book.
     
    coffeekid likes this.

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