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It's not teaching I dislike, it's my school...

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by Georgia99, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Georgia99

    Georgia99 New commenter

    It has taken me a long time to realise this. I had been looking at other career options after being thoroughly miserable in my NQT post. However, it has really hit home now that it is not the teaching I dislike, it is the school.
    I listed all the reasons I hate my job. Reasons were along the lines of....little NQT support, unfriendly colleagues and low morale/lots of bitching, feeling isolated and not part of the school, having very difficult classes and a classroom that is not fit for purpose (e.g. not enough computers for kids which are needed for coursework, not even enough tables for my class size-they are squeezed in). Having a rather nasty hod who I never see.
    Not one of the reasons is about the teaching side, the planning side or the marking etc.
    My contract is maternity and I am starting to embrace this. It means that I can seek alternative employment without it being questioned. My school have offered me a part time permanent post and while some may say it is silly to decline, I am going to because the school isn't right for me and part time hours are not enough for me anyway.
    I love my PGCE placements and really hope I'll be fortunate enough to secure a future teaching post in a school I feel part of.
    I know there are many other NQTs that feel the same way. Think about the reasons you want to quit your school before turning your back on teaching. Is it the teaching side you hate or the school?
     
  2. Georgia99

    Georgia99 New commenter

    It has taken me a long time to realise this. I had been looking at other career options after being thoroughly miserable in my NQT post. However, it has really hit home now that it is not the teaching I dislike, it is the school.
    I listed all the reasons I hate my job. Reasons were along the lines of....little NQT support, unfriendly colleagues and low morale/lots of bitching, feeling isolated and not part of the school, having very difficult classes and a classroom that is not fit for purpose (e.g. not enough computers for kids which are needed for coursework, not even enough tables for my class size-they are squeezed in). Having a rather nasty hod who I never see.
    Not one of the reasons is about the teaching side, the planning side or the marking etc.
    My contract is maternity and I am starting to embrace this. It means that I can seek alternative employment without it being questioned. My school have offered me a part time permanent post and while some may say it is silly to decline, I am going to because the school isn't right for me and part time hours are not enough for me anyway.
    I love my PGCE placements and really hope I'll be fortunate enough to secure a future teaching post in a school I feel part of.
    I know there are many other NQTs that feel the same way. Think about the reasons you want to quit your school before turning your back on teaching. Is it the teaching side you hate or the school?
     
  3. I had this exact same problem at my second PGCE placement. It wasn't the teaching aspect which I disliked, but the school (I actually hated the school atmosphere so much I very, VERY nearly quit my PGCE even with only about 5 weeks to go- I was that desperate to get out)!

    Having now been at other schools on supply (and even just for interviews) where the staff (who don't even know who you are) at least say hello, I know that I do enjoy the teaching aspect, but having a good overall work environment where the people are friendly is so important too.
     
  4. j_pink

    j_pink New commenter

    It's amazing how schools can differ so much. I hated my training school but love my NQT school. Everyone stuck their noses up at me choosing a national challenge school but I'm so glad I did. My last school was very competitive, the staff all walked over each other to get promotions and it was so bitchy. Something can be said for having a good look around schools. You really get a feel for if you would fit in and enjoy it.
     
  5. I was about to write something asking people for advice and saw this, which just sums up what I wanted to say!
    I've only been in my NQT position since start of January. So it will seem like I haven't even given it a chance yet but I'm a good judge of situations and how I feel. I've already started considering wanting to leave at the end of summer term or at the end of my induction (although this will be a last resort and I've been made very aware of my situation on the jobseekers forum today).
    I'm not work-shy and enjoy planning once I get into it and even when I'm overwhelmed with work I can think about why I'm doing it and stay positive. Like you have all put it, it's the school bothering me, not teaching.
    I accepted this job in a completely unfamiliar age group (different curriculum, different set-up, different assessment and everything) with the promise of support to get me started. I thought it would also be in the best interests of the school to offer this support as they should want me to succeed for the sake of the children and their reputation, but I have yet to receive any. I've had to muddle through on my own (it's a one form entry primary) because my NQT mentor is so busy and as a result I'm not getting everything right, which my deputy head has noticed and complains about a lot rather than offering advice. I also don't get regular PPA or NQT time - the school really seems to struggle getting cover and I'm made to feel guilty if I ask - which doesn't help at all with the workload and means I can't plan things for my professional development, like observing other foundation stage teachers or units to understand better what I'm supposed to be doing. I asked about some training being run by the LA, free of cost to the school, which I think will really help me but they said there won't be cover and the best thing for me to do is spend as much time as possible in class. The whole school seems worn out and uninspiring. Staff are exhausted, too busy to talk and offer advice, too fed up to want to talk about teaching, their ideas, their philosophies etc. The strong ethos and passion they talked about in the interview is not very evident at all once in amongst it all.
    I just don't seem to fit in and feel awful about going to work because I'm not doing it properly and not being offered any support to improve. I know it's partly my fault for accepting a job I knew would be tough. But at the same time I was entirely truthful in my interview about my lack of experience with this age group, so they knew and could either have chosen another candidate if it was too much for them, or prepared some support for me. It seems they didn't prepare themselves for that or really for taking on an NQT at all.
    I really don't know whether to just keep my head down, knowing I'm not getting a great deal with my induction (lack of time, training, support etc), or to consider leaving, or to ask my head if it is possible (though I very much doubt it) if I can change year groups for September so I'm more comfortable and enjoy it more. I've had it put to me by several people that I should be grateful to have a job at all and need to get on with it. I guess people who have their NQT years in good schools with lots of support and training are just more lucky!


     
  6. This sounds exactly like me!

    Same position...The school is not right for me and I am desperate to leave at Easter but have nothing else to go to. I would love to be in a school where I had good support.

    At least I know I am not on my own!

    Jaime
     

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