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iss confusion

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by lexie09, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. For a long time now my supply agency have been trying to get me to sign up with ISS and I have held out for several months. They rang again tonight trying to get me to go for it and catching me when I was rather distracted I agreed verbally to go with it.

    This is something that I instantly regret, thing is although I agreed verbally will I be able to ring them back tomorrow and say actually Ive done some reading up on it and I dont want Iss.

    Does anyone else have experience of this or advice?

    The part of all this ISS that worries me is NI contributions and payment of tax.

    Im all a bit confused
     
  2. Would you like to explain what ISS is please.
     
  3. It's an umbrella company that takes a percentage for dealing with your pay - the upside is you can claim (or rather offset against tax and NI) your daily expenses...
    so the standard rate is around £7.50 for lunch
    0.40 to 0.44 pence per mile for fuel
    your union subs, GTC payment can all be offset against your income tax.
    I use keypay, ISS are similar though when I spoke to them am considering going over as apparently under key i pay employer's NI contribution and employee's contribution...
    as ISS is C'Island based I will only pay employee's contribution.
    I'm going to double check this but I was sceptical too, however, my net is definitely more under umbrella co. as before my food and fuel i would have to pay for regardless.
    just keep simple fuel log and though receipts aren't required- as long as you incurred an expense can offset the full amount ( i keep receipts regardless as IR can request sample of expense claims if they want to though unlikely and the co. should do random checks to comply with tax rules anyway.
    It's nothing to worry about and I do earn more, as I'm doing 50 miles a day it does help.
     
  4. All this talk of "umbrella companies"...ONE BIG FRAUDULENT SCAM.
    The agency stop paying your NI which is actually illegal.
    Why cannot the agency itself pay your expenses, increase pay etc???

     
  5. probably because of the state of the supply market I imagine - as I said ISS apparently won't pay the NI contribution unlike the UK based ones.
    agencies will save costs wherever they can- work is in such short supply - rates have gone down since I first started rather than up so any increase in pay is a pipe dream right now I'm afraid.
    hey it's optional- no one forces you to do it- my pay is definitely more than before so i'm reasonably satisfied but it's not for everyone but I can't see it as fraudulent scam more an avoidance of taxes
    i detailed the down and upside above - people make their own choice if they want to or not
     
  6. Sooner or later the tax man will catch up with you, not the office in the Channel Isles, nor the supply agency who employed you, the tax office will deal directly with you, probably when work is not so readily available. Hope it all works out for you, but I have this nagging feeling that it might not.
     
  7. This ISS nonsense is <u>completely fraudulent</u> and no supply teacher should be joining this corrupt scheme.
    Forget "markets", stupid explanations etc etc it is simply unacceptable to be exploited by an agency as it is; and then to be FURTHER EXPLOITED by some offshore company that is ripping off the taxpayer including the idiots who join the scheme.
    NO WAY!!!!!! I pay tax and NI. Do not join. Do be conned. Do not be bullied and resist all threats to join this corrupt scheme!
     
  8. It is totally legal so I wish people would stop saying otherwise. If you do a reasonable amount of miles a day you will gain when you claim mileage and subsistance. My agency does not pay the NI but my daily rate went up to compensate so I did not lose out. By using an umbrella agency, your teaching agency cuts their admin costs.
     
  9. Umbrella companies may change their focus!
    I would advise not to sign up unless you have sought financial advise properly. HMRC are now chasing companies and assigning debts to the recruitment agencies. It's possible that they will also come after "you" for unpaid taxes.
    http://www.recruiter.co.uk/recruiters-urged-to-review-contractor-compliance-procedures/1009332.article
    In this news article 3 weeks ago, the HMRC are assigning &pound;10Million to the recruitment agency and it's directors for unpaid tax.

     
  10. You are talking absolute rubbish!
    If an agency uses an offshore company [highly dubious] to avoid paying income tax then it is TOTALLY ILLEGAL!!
    This umbrella company scheme which avoids paying tax on your behalf as well as not paying income tax on behalf of its call centre operatives is acting illegally. Its greedy directors will be charged for tax avoidance and the HMRC will come for you so STOP THE RIDICULOUS SELF-DECEPTION!!!!
     
  11. tax avoidance is perfectly legal, tax evasion is not - by being CI based they avoid the NI, but as I said I'm not with ISS anyway so I pay my contributions anyway.
    It is also perfectly legal as another poster quoted below and I cannot see that a large agency would be connected with anything likely to bring them into disrepute or clash with IR.
    I'm also a Business teacher by the way so I'm hardly naive about companied and ethics
     
  12. it is not an avoidance of income tax (though avoidance is perfectly legal-evasion is not),
    it's a perfectly normal way of offsetting expenses such as fuel and food and other professional costs such as subs against your gross pay.
    This is what millons of self-employed people do everyday and it really is not an issue.
    If you want use it then do, if not carry on as you are, no one forces you to do it.
     
  13. Self-employed people must declare their earnings (by law) and are taxed by the HMRC!

     

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