1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Islam - year 8

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by binkiebeaumont, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. Hi I'm hoping for some help!
    I'm not a specialist but teach Yr 7 through to KS4 short course.
    I currently have a very difficult yr 8 class - very narrow minded and lessons can be very difficult because of their pre conceived ideas about Muslims. They are opinionated but in a wrong way! I'm looking for advice to help turn things around so that they involve themselves more in the learning. I've just done work with them on the life of Muhammad and they didn't respond particularly well. The 5 pillars are next in the scheme of work and i'm wondering if anyone has ideas for some fun lessons on this. I don't have an IWB! I've thought about cutting out some pillar templates and pupils write/stick on info?
    Any suggestions gratefully received!
    Thanks!
     
  2. Hi I'm hoping for some help!
    I'm not a specialist but teach Yr 7 through to KS4 short course.
    I currently have a very difficult yr 8 class - very narrow minded and lessons can be very difficult because of their pre conceived ideas about Muslims. They are opinionated but in a wrong way! I'm looking for advice to help turn things around so that they involve themselves more in the learning. I've just done work with them on the life of Muhammad and they didn't respond particularly well. The 5 pillars are next in the scheme of work and i'm wondering if anyone has ideas for some fun lessons on this. I don't have an IWB! I've thought about cutting out some pillar templates and pupils write/stick on info?
    Any suggestions gratefully received!
    Thanks!
     
  3. If it was me I would stop the SoW and do one or two lessons on Islamophobia. Acknowledge their ideas, but try to explain the historical & political context where they have come from. Look at different media influences & ask why they think these things. Hopefully they'll be a few kids in the group you can get on side to help push this idea. These guys have grown in a post-9/11 society, to them Muslims are the enermy & are terrorists, so they need to look at why that is. Maybe even talk about previous terrorists groups (IRA). My key point I always bang on about is that there are 1 billion Muslims in the world, if they were all terrorists the rest of us would be dead!!
    Start form what they know & try to move it on, using the key facts. There's no way your going to convince them that Muslims are peaceful wonderful people (with a few exceptions) from looking at the 5 pillars!!
    When you do get to the 5 pillars (which, in my opinion is anexeptionally boring subject!) try to make it as active as possible (I'm guessing they're low ability) and always start form what they know. Do they give to charity? why? Turn your room into a Mosque, get the kids to take their shoes off before they enter, Wudu, separate from boys & girls, lots of labels aorund the room for different parts. Go on Hajj, meet them on the door with 'plane tickets', set your room out like a plane. BBC 'Class CLips has some great resources. Think about the practical element of getting so many people. Swine flu caused a few issues last year, maybe compare to the London Olympics.
    And, lastly, if it's possible, try to get a Muslim visitor speaker in to break down those preconceptions.
     
  4. I have some lesson plans and slides on the five pillars that I'll try to post next week. There are also lots of short videos about the five pillars on the bbc.


    I tried to get the students to link the five pillars to things in their own lives, e.g.


    for shahahdah, I got the students to write their own declaration of faith or beliefs that were important to them on a sheet of a4 and deocrated these with an islamic border pattern. I also showed them the "i am canadian" molson ad (youtube)


    For salat i got them to think about how they show respect to an important guest or visitor - this year I'm also thinking of getting them to turn the stages of salat into a flick book or computer animation


    Sawm I linked to the idea of trying to be the best possible version of themselves - at the start of the lesson I got them to write about how a perfect student would behave in the lesson, then challenged them to try to live up to it for the whole lesson - then at the end, I got them to write a reflection about whether they found it hard / easy / completely forgot about it!


    Zakat I linked to charity and asked them to think about how much of their pocket money the do / should give to charity over the course of a year. I then got them to calculate how much it would be according to zakat.


    Hajj links nicely to getting students to think about the rituals associated with special places, e.g. football stadiums. I also got them to design a tour brochure for a hajj pilgrimage.


    I run a lesson before I start the five pillars in which I more or less just get the students to list and share their views / current perceptions of Islam and try to debunk these where necessary.
     
  5. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    "GruffyMax" I agree 100% when you say, 'If it was me I would stop the SoW and do one or two lessons on Islamophobia. Acknowledge their ideas, but try to explain the historical & political context where they have come from. Look at different media influences & ask why they think these things. Hopefully they'll be a few kids in the group you can get on side to help push this idea. These guys have grown in a post-9/11 society, to them Muslims are the enermy & are terrorists, so they need to look at why that is. Maybe even talk about previous terrorists groups (IRA). My key point I always bang on about is that there are 1 billion Muslims in the world, if they were all terrorists the rest of us would be dead!!


    That sounds a very good approach to me. In responding to another thread about hostility to Islam I suggested looking at the way that the different communities responded to the riots in August. The following two contacts are some I found very quickly but there are lots which are relevant.


    We live in a country where there are large communities who practise different religions. If we don't make an effort to understand each other then we are likely to see violence escalate in our communities and possibly condemning many of our young people to death. Your students need to understand that there are many youngsters growing up just like them, who happen to have been born into a family with a different religious tradition. But that does not ,make them bad. If they make the effort to get to know them they will find they are very good friends.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/aug/12/birmingham-riots-tariq-jahan

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/aug/11/uk-riots-birmingham-muslim-sikhs
     
  6. Thank you all so much for your responses, tips and advice. Certainly a lot to think about there. One thing i'm learning is that throwing lots of content at them is not the way forward. You're right - discussion and airing opinions and beliefs is the best way to gauge how pupils feel and how they're going to respond to this. I also have a Muslim pupil in the class, so perhaps I could ask her to talk about her life/experiences.....

    Feeling motivated and less deflated now!!
    Thanks again - really grateful!
    Binks
     
  7. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    There are a few resources on my resources which may be useful here. Personally I would start with the ideas expressed above but when you do get on to the Five Pillars this resource is quite popular -.


    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Five-Pillars-of-Islam-especially-Zakat-6088905/


    the resource
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/poems-about-God-from-students-Atheism-and-Islam-6078637/


    may be quite useful and I guess if I had this class I might start with the 'God Poem' exercise as it gets them thinking about what they believe and why - which is essential as a foundation for thinking about what other people believe and also improves their self-esteem and gives them a good feeling because you are valuing their identity and point of view.
     
  8. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter


    here are the comments from teachers using this particular resouce


    really interesting - thanks for sharing.

    from v, 01 November 2011 (report comment) 5 out of 5


    Thank you so much for sharing this. I look forward to sharing this with classes. It is so beautiful, and wise!
    from s, 29 October 2011 (report comment) 5 out of 5


    Wow, what insightful and beautiful poetry - so well articulated. I start teaching a module on Islam this September with a slant on Islam in Britain today - this will be an excellent resource for helping pupils relate to a british Muslim of their own age. Thanks for posting
     
  9. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter


    I guess that most people who teach RE know exactly the kind of problem that binkieb is talking about here. We are in the business of opening minds and exploring truths, seeking for greater truth in all aspects of life.


    Prejudices and preconceptions do get explored but the big thing is how to actually engage with youngsters like this, who often do not want to know.


    Any generalisation about any group of people is almost always false because you are dealing with many individuals and they are all very different. One approach might be to invite Muslim speakers from several different branches of Islam to come in to talk about their life, rather than their religion, and then answer questions. I find that when our students meet real people they start to realise that they share a lot in common.


    perhaps the previous poster would benefit from meeting a range of different Muslims, too. The fear of Islam is very deeprooted and widely held in our society and it simply is not based on reality.
     
  10. There's a tendency amongst RE teachers to take religious groups at their own self-evaluation.


     

Share This Page