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Is unpaid trial becoming the norm?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by George1164, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. I have recently been approached by a placement agency, asking whether I would be interested in being put forward fro a job for the latter part of the summer term, provided I complete successfully four weeks 'unpaid assesment' first. This is not the first such 'offer' I have had, and some come directly from schools. Is this becoming the norm?
     
  2. I have recently been approached by a placement agency, asking whether I would be interested in being put forward fro a job for the latter part of the summer term, provided I complete successfully four weeks 'unpaid assesment' first. This is not the first such 'offer' I have had, and some come directly from schools. Is this becoming the norm?
     
  3. I don't know if this is the norm, but if you are in a position of being able to work 4 weeks unpaid why not go for it? If nothing else it will give you experience to add to any future applications? Is this a genuine offer though and not just a way for a school to get free cover? I'm sure Laura and Theo will have more insight.... Emsbeth
     
  4. Aaaargh you must be barmy for even considering this - even if you could afford the travel expenses, lunches etc not to mention working unpaid. Agencies will try anything on and, if you accept this, it will become more prevalent. IT IS BAD ENOUGH THEY WANT A TEACHER TO DO IT FOR ONE DAY. NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    No, not the norm. And totally unacceptable.
    I wonder, indeed, if it is the school who is not paying, or the agency that is not handing on the school's payment.
    I would write directly to the school saying that you would love to work for them, and would agree to a one-day trial, but that you are sure that they will understand that to do a month's free teaching at their school, as they have requested, is not possible.
    Be interesting to see their response to this.
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk for one-to-one sessions.
     
  6. Thank you for your input, everyone. Since I already have decades of teaching experience, I do not think another four weeks 'work experience' would make my CV look any better. I am a physics teacher, now in my mid-ffties and, since redundancy two years ago, I have worked only sporadically, mainly as a TA, so I cannot in any way afford to work for nothing.
    I take your point about repacious agencies, but, as I said, schools themselves try to pull the same trick. Recently, I did a fortnight in a Brent school, doing mornings of in-class support for EAL an SEN students for £7:20 ph. The school, as I found out, had a 'zero hours' system, which meant that if one or more of the students I was following was not in school on a particular day, I was not paid for that lesson. To fill in these gaps, I was asked to do some 'ad-hoc' tutoring of AS and A2 physics students, as their regular teacher was absent, for the same hourly rate, of course. To my shame, twice I actually did this, just to recoup my travelling expenses.
     

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