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"Is this for an assessment Miss?"

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by anon3946, Jun 6, 2011.

  1. A question I've come across numerous times. It seems students are less willing to pull their fingers out for non-AfL stuff. How to stop this attitude? I'm a cover supervisor at the moment; doing my PGCE in September.
    I try to have a mix between penalising poor effort (which can be hard to measure when I don't know their abilities and I often don't even get an "all/most/some") and giving merits for good effort. I do try and award on effort- I know there are some students who can pull out high level work with less effort than a lower ability student could produce a medium level piece of work- but as I've said, there are pitfalls in this approach and I worry I miss things.
    Is it something that will fall away when I have my own classes? What techniques can I employ to make sure students put in the same level of work in an assessment driven piece of work as opposed to a non-assessment piece? I did think something based on the American system, where every piece is graded and an average worked out across the year? Maybe comparable to AfL marking? But that did strike me as possibly unrealistic.
    And now I'm waffling.... All ideas welcome- many thanks in advance!

     
  2. A question I've come across numerous times. It seems students are less willing to pull their fingers out for non-AfL stuff. How to stop this attitude? I'm a cover supervisor at the moment; doing my PGCE in September.
    I try to have a mix between penalising poor effort (which can be hard to measure when I don't know their abilities and I often don't even get an "all/most/some") and giving merits for good effort. I do try and award on effort- I know there are some students who can pull out high level work with less effort than a lower ability student could produce a medium level piece of work- but as I've said, there are pitfalls in this approach and I worry I miss things.
    Is it something that will fall away when I have my own classes? What techniques can I employ to make sure students put in the same level of work in an assessment driven piece of work as opposed to a non-assessment piece? I did think something based on the American system, where every piece is graded and an average worked out across the year? Maybe comparable to AfL marking? But that did strike me as possibly unrealistic.
    And now I'm waffling.... All ideas welcome- many thanks in advance!

     
  3. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Lead commenter

    I can't give you much advice. What you're doing sounds good. I was never so depressed as when I read a letter in the paper from a university student claiming that her first year was wasted as the marks in the exams didn't count towards her degree. It didn'tseem to have occurred to her that you do a degree to learn things... So it's not surprising that your students have this attitude,and frankly, the school system encourages it by only valuing the things that are tested externally. I should think once you have your own class you'll find it easier to put across your own ideas about why work should be done.
     
  4. Oh dear! My grades in my first year were actually on a par with my third year grades- even a smidge higher at times- because as I went further through my course, I wanted to explore more and more. I chose a riskier dissertation topic because I wanted to know and learn and explore my own ideas more than I wanted to play it safe for a grade. It's a shame to think that education for education's sake isn't valued as it ought.
    Another idea that I was thinking... my secondary school would grade on effort as well as attainment and a C1 was considered better than an A3 (1 being outstanding effort, 5 being barely making a scrawl). Tricky at the moment but maybe with my own class? Or should I be wary of a. creating excessive work and 2. implementing marking systems that aren't schoolwide? (I don't meant that I'd ignore the school's main marking policy- merely have my own as well to track this sort of thing?)
    Sorry, thinking as I type here...
     
  5. I would advise you to stick to the school marking policy and also to possibly avoid simple grades if you can. It may be useful for some pieces of work but a comment would perhaps be better - you could even have a printed sheet with somment codes to give to your students at the beginning of term so that when you put the letter/number they can then copy out the statement or look it up.
    I put comments on pieces of work but grade the pieces for my markbook in terms of effort 1 being excellent and 5 being no effort. I - Incomplete. Students don't see this but it helps me to track their attitude towards classowrk and homework.
     
  6. Thank you Jane, useful stuff- a good middle ground, it seems!`
     

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