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Is this advice appropriate for a KS2 pupil?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by gsm1380, May 5, 2012.

  1. Hi, it has come to my attention this week that a 2 different children in a KS2 class have been given "advice" by their teacher about some minor issues with other children (name calling, not playing together etc.). I would like to know your views on the quality and appropriateness of what was said.



    One girl in Y4 is friends with lots in the class. She is friends with boys and girls. Some girls only want her to play with the other girls, and so get upset when there are boys playing with her too. This child felt upset last week that she had lots of children "fighting over her" and she didn't like that. The CT tried various approaches to dealing with this, for example, saying that she could pre-arrange who she would play with, and join in organised games. But this didn't do the trick. In the end he said that she would always have boys and girls "fighting" over her, especially in the future, as she is popular and "it happens a lot as you get older". So basically she was told to deal with it! Thoughts?



    Another child was being called some names in class by another child. The CT said that the other child was jealous that she had lots of friends and was liked by everyone, so she should just ignore it.



    Perhaps this is good advice and just not the type of thing I would necessarily say myself. But I'm not sure...!
     
  2. Hi, it has come to my attention this week that a 2 different children in a KS2 class have been given "advice" by their teacher about some minor issues with other children (name calling, not playing together etc.). I would like to know your views on the quality and appropriateness of what was said.



    One girl in Y4 is friends with lots in the class. She is friends with boys and girls. Some girls only want her to play with the other girls, and so get upset when there are boys playing with her too. This child felt upset last week that she had lots of children "fighting over her" and she didn't like that. The CT tried various approaches to dealing with this, for example, saying that she could pre-arrange who she would play with, and join in organised games. But this didn't do the trick. In the end he said that she would always have boys and girls "fighting" over her, especially in the future, as she is popular and "it happens a lot as you get older". So basically she was told to deal with it! Thoughts?



    Another child was being called some names in class by another child. The CT said that the other child was jealous that she had lots of friends and was liked by everyone, so she should just ignore it.



    Perhaps this is good advice and just not the type of thing I would necessarily say myself. But I'm not sure...!
     
  3. I question why you are getting involved in how another teacher has dealt with behaviour matters in her class. It is very difficult to know exactly what has happened previously and whether she is dealing with an ongoing problem that has had a lot of input/parental involvment already. If you are worried about the other teacher's ability to care for her pupils, then I would speak to the head teacher and voice your concerns.
     
  4. HMMMMMMMM. I wouldn't have said either of those things but then again, I often ovehear other members of staff saying stuff which makes me inwardly raise my eyebrow. I wouldn't dream of going and telling tales and I recognise that I don't know the full context and background. If you're that worried about how he's handled it, I think you should help him to handle future situations better - i.e. give him practical advice - rather than just getting him into trouble. As I say to my class constantly, just worry about what YOU are doing!
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    After months of dealing with endless squabbles and fallings out, it is more than possible that a teacher, sick to the back teeth of it all, did say more or less this. And to some extent it is the best possible advice. Yes it needs to be given kindly, but we do need to teach children to be resilient and learn to manage hassles independently. It hardly seems a terrible crime.
    I sometimes say to children 'Awww that is so horrible and must have really hurt you. But so and so is having a really tough time at the moment and so is jealous when they see other people happy. Shall we be really, really kind and understanding and let them get away with it just this once?' Reduced to a critical post on here it would look awful, but in reality it isn't at all.

    Maybe it wasn't ideal. Maybe the teacher didn't deal with it perfectly. But hey it is good to hear I'm not the only one who occasionally gets it wrong. As long as they are a great teacher with the best interests of the children at heart, then the odd slightly insensitive remark should matter much.
     

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