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Is this acceptable??

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by whispy-willow, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. I'm trained to deliver a modern language in primary. There are two composite classes that have to be taught, a p6-7 and p5-6. The 7 are a year ahead of the 6. My ht expects me to manage the two, the plan however is very difficult, I'll try to explain it as best I can. I should send my 7 to the 5-6 teacher, therefore she should do something with the 5 & 7, but this takes her over 25, so 3 of them have to go away somewhere in the school with my learning support, who is assigned to p6 pupils with severe learning needs. Then the p7 are to be sent back to me and I'm expected to find my p6 something independent to do when I teach the p7, bearing in mind most of them have learning support needs. Is this allowed? I don't mind going to teach the two years separately, but shouldn't the ht arrange cover for me to do this? I'm really stressed. So it appears that I'll be planning four times, something for three p7s to do with ls, coping alone with p6 who have severe needs, then expecting said p6 to sit quietly so i can teach p7? This will take double blocks in an already packed timetable Can the ht get away with this? Does anyone know if I have grounds to refuse?
     
  2. Flyonthewall75

    Flyonthewall75 New commenter

    If I understand you correctly, this arrangement is to allow pupils at P6 and P7 to be taught a modern language and you are the teacher who has the required training.
    From the arrangement you describe, it would appear that the P6s in the composite P5/6 are not taught a modern language. Is there a reason for this and what happens when they move into P7?
    Composite classes are a fact of life in most primary schools and therefore there has to be some compromise in how the classes are taught.
    A simple solution would be for you to teach your own P6/7 class the modern language and then exchange classes with the P5/6 teacher to teach the P5/6 a modern language.
    You say that the P7s are a year ahead of the P6s but in schools where composites have been arranged by age, this would normally be only 6 months and the same would apply to the P5/6.
    I do sometimes wonder why some schools make life difficult for themselves. The children in the P5/6 and P6/7 will almost certainly do other curricular areas together, such as Music, Art, Science, Topic Work, RME etc, so why not a modern language.
    It's not as if younger, or less experienced, pupils can not learn from the older ones in a composite class, particularly where there may be a wide range of ability at each stage.
    Of course, it may be your HT does not believe this arrangement is ideal but, then, we don't live in an ideal world and the current arrangement you describe does sound somewhat contrived and disruptive.
    Apologies if I have misunderstood your problem.
     
  3. I think the P6s from both composites were going to be taught together while the P5/6 teacher had P5s and most of the P7s.

    The problem with teaching P5/6 a modern language is that other P5s (in a straight or P4/5 class) would then wonder why they weren't getting it -or else their parents might.

    Not all composites are arranged by age so this won't be as good a solution -and the P7s would still have done more in the language.
     
  4. spoke to ht today, going to teach my p6-7 together, the p7 will just have to go over the lessons taught last year. The p5-6 teacher will swap with me to cover my class and I will teach the p5-6 class. This is certainly less stressful, and makes more sense. It's not ideal but the other way was far too difficult.
     

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