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Is there any hope?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by emmyisobel, May 12, 2019.

  1. emmyisobel

    emmyisobel New commenter

    Hi everyone, just looking for a bit of advice.
    To cut a long story short I gained my secondary pgce in 2009, although getting a few interviews I was unable to secure a full time post so worked in supply until 2015 when I had my youngest daughter-since then I have been self employed but now that my youngest has started full time school I really would like to get into teaching. A couple of jobs have come up in my area and I really want to apply but have I any real chance of getting a foot in the door? I am in the South West
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  2. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    yes of course. What subject are you?
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  3. emmyisobel

    emmyisobel New commenter

    geography-went I did my pgce we were told move away from the south west if you can-when people get jobs here they literally stay in them till they pop their clogs!!!! I am trying to widen my knowledge and am undertaking an open masters at the mo-just done 60 credits in pyschology
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  4. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    Basically you have had no full time positions and have done a number of years supply.

    In addition you are in an area where there are traditionally very few jobs and you're looking for a position in an are where there is no shortage.

    I hate to be a pessimist but you are really up against it as far as getting a permanent position.
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  5. emmyisobel

    emmyisobel New commenter

    not pessimistic just realistic! thought as much-well lets see what happens!
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  6. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    sorry, I missread this. I thought your childrren had FINISHED school, not just started.

    Full time school teaching isn't really compatible with motherhood.

    There are other options. have you thought about tutoring? primary? job share? teaching business? colleges? adult education?
     
    hope4thefuture and pepper5 like this.
  7. emmyisobel

    emmyisobel New commenter

    Surely there must be some mothers out there you are also teachers! just want to be a geography teacher!-really don't fancy primary, no nothing about business and down these parts there is not a lot of adult education provision. Things are not looking good for me are they
     
    sooooexcited and pepper5 like this.
  8. emmyisobel

    emmyisobel New commenter

    *obviously I meant know not no
     
  9. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    There are some. not in my school. There is one mother in my school who is part time, and is desperate to cut her hours further.

    There was a mother with school age children in a school I worked in a few years ago, but she had her mother living with her.
     
    emmyisobel likes this.
  10. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    what were you self employed as? How about online tutoring?
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  11. emmyisobel

    emmyisobel New commenter

    It is so sad but I love the classroom and my subject
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  12. sabrinakat

    sabrinakat Star commenter

    In my independent (Kent), all but one in my department has children; three of us under 8. In fact, across my school, at least 30% have children. So, it's not all bad news to have small children and be a full-time teacher.
     
  13. sooooexcited

    sooooexcited Occasional commenter

    I am a full time mother, full time Headteacher and occasional class teacher. You can do it, it's just bl**dy hard.

    Don't give up.
     
  14. pwtin

    pwtin Senior commenter

    Given that it appears you have not set foot in a classroom since 2015 I would be pleasantly surprised if you managed to secure a permanent post. Why not go back on supply and aim to get a long term placement to start with.
     
    sabrinakat, agathamorse and pepper5 like this.
  15. becky70

    becky70 Occasional commenter

    I have colleagues in my primary school who have children and teach full time but it's not easy. Primary shouldn't be chosen as an option that's more compatible with motherhood.
    I think you'll have to do supply if you're getting nowhere with job applications. Could be a way to get your foot in the door.
     
    agathamorse and pepper5 like this.
  16. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    I'm sure its far easier to be a mother if you are a head teacher
     
  17. I did my PGCE with a two year old, and have worked since then with a child still not in school full time. It is doable, although hard work at times. I hate parents evenings as she is inevitably asleep by the time I get home, but other than that, I make it work. That said, both mine and my OH parents are retired and can provide wrap around care from nursery hours to help us out. If you don't have that, it can get expensive quickly with afterschool care
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  18. notreallyme75

    notreallyme75 New commenter

    How so? How is it easier? Just wondering why you thought this, that’s all. I’m neither a teacher or a headteacher but I do work in a school and I am a mother!
     
  19. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    because you can just decide to make allowances for yourself any time you like! Because your job is so much more flexible than a teaching job, because you can award yourself the priviledge of working from home , because you can afford so much more childcare, because the hours of a head teacher are so much less than the hours of a teacher

    etc etc etc etc etc
     

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