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Is the high demand for tutors nationwide or just near london?

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by tsarina, Jan 26, 2017.

  1. tsarina

    tsarina Occasional commenter

    I am genuinely interested...it astonishes me how many parents (and kids) want a science tutor, especially bright, hard working kids from good schools. I have some theories but that might just be my own experiences colouring my outlook :)
     
    Mrsmumbles likes this.
  2. langteacher

    langteacher Occasional commenter

    I am languages in the north west and am fully booked with a waiting list
     
    Mrsmumbles, sabram86 and tsarina like this.
  3. Informant

    Informant New commenter

    Never been as busy as this year (fully booked weeks ago) [Suffolk]
     
    Mrsmumbles and tsarina like this.
  4. tsarina

    tsarina Occasional commenter

    Do you think it is more the competition for good grades or because of a lack of experienced subject specialist teachers in school?
     
  5. decj

    decj New commenter

    North-west, fully booked with waiting list and have been for years.
    x
     
    tsarina likes this.
  6. mathsmutt

    mathsmutt Star commenter

    All secondary school teachers in Scotland are subject specialists, yet maths and science tutors are always in demand.

    To be eligible for registration in Scotland, you must have a relevant degree and a recognised teaching qualification at SCQF level 9 or above.
    http://www.gtcs.org.uk/registration/registration.aspx

    I understand that it is totally different in England, where anyone can be asked to teach anything as long as they have QTS. This may impact the requirement for tutors.
     
    tsarina likes this.
  7. sabram86

    sabram86 Occasional commenter

    I started out tutoring full-time in September, after leaving my NQT year very swiftly.

    I'm fully booked up too! I work in Lancashire and Greater Manchester.
     
    tsarina likes this.
  8. newageteacher

    newageteacher New commenter

    How do you all get fully booked? I have been with online tutor websites for over a year and have yet to have even one student!!! I don't know any other way to get students either. What do you do to get your students? Do you advertise? My main subject has just so many tutors it's unvelievable. That's why I can't get any students I think, there;s just too many tutors trying to undercut you.
     
  9. tsarina

    tsarina Occasional commenter

    I am on an online website and although i get enquires, for some reason it never pans out, times don't work or they are too far away. Most of my business has come from advertising in a local free posh magazine that gets delivered to about 40,000 homes; a small 3cm by 3cm box costs about £40 and goes in the classified section for tutors. I have a yell listing and website and business cards up aound the place but it is the magazine or reccomendations that i get new business from.
     
  10. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Hi there, I think it is a mixture of things. Autonomy and a return to your tried Andrea tested teaching style automatically rubs out half the stress I used to have. I remember being so irritated being lectured to by new managers about how my lessons were automatically rubbish because they did nit have diurbtyoes of differentuationnin them or iPad apps during off left right and centre. NO reports, bullying, office cliques, boring admin, boring INSET days, course changes, office pettiness, or unpaid extras. Which, of course, makes me want to go the extra mile. More variety. Learning how to teach younger kids, which means I'd be confident offering a bit of prep or primary school age supply in the future, when the madness has died down in schools. Best of all is the attitude of parents. With one exception ( I coach an excluded girl who has been utterly down by her two former schools, teachers and parents) the students I coach all want to learn. And their parents wouldn't dare criticise or attack me, as I'm their guilty little 'hopefully make the grade difference' secret! And I know that some of them would be unbearable to have as parents. But they respect me, which is a refreshing change. And the demand will increase, especially in the big cities, as the supply is so poor. It amuses me that Gove destroyed so much of this country that was good, including my former job, both of us were forced out, and both have now had to rebrand ourselves and do somehting different. And that's where our similarities end!
     
    tsarina likes this.
  11. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Try Tutorhunt.
     
  12. tsarina

    tsarina Occasional commenter

    I agree that i am doing now what i used to do years ago in the classroom; actual teaching so the students understand concepts. However it saddens me that i can only teach affluent students, and am now contibuting to the inequality of education in society.
     
    Mrsmumbles, Billie73 and mathsmutt like this.
  13. lucid_dreamer

    lucid_dreamer New commenter

    Are any of you 'fully booked' ones English tutors? Seems like the maths tutors are the ones that have constant work, or is that just a stereotype?
     
  14. tsarina

    tsarina Occasional commenter

    I'm science and I am now officially fully booked. :)
     
  15. Ian1983

    Ian1983 Occasional commenter

    Being known by the local schools
    Vehicle graphics
    Word of mouth
     
  16. sockknittingtubes

    sockknittingtubes New commenter

    I do some work in a local youthclub for deprived teenagers and offer to help with homework- amazing how many come and ask for help- do not get paid - very rewarding
     
    tosh740 and tsarina like this.
  17. Apple101

    Apple101 Occasional commenter

    Unless you do English Maths or Science you will struggle. I know a few successful language tutors but then they are not limited to school kids. Also a couple computer science that seem to be successful.
     
  18. newageteacher

    newageteacher New commenter

    I do instrumental tuition. There are lots of instrumental teachers on TH and FT and although people have looked at my profile they are like another poster says too far away or some other reason they don't want to purchase your details. I also live in a really crapy city where no one is affluent and it's full of immigrants. You can buy a 3 bed house for 130k -150k for example. Compare that with surrey where any town there will cost like 400-800k to buy a 3 bed house.

    I wouldn't have thought "being known by the local schools" would be any help. Wouldn't think the schools would be bothered knowing you anyway since that is what they do themselves, ie teach. It would be embarrassing to the school to offer a private tutor I think. That's what they do in Greece!!

    I might change my subject then and teach maths since I have A level maths.
     
    tsarina likes this.
  19. Jolly_Roger1

    Jolly_Roger1 Star commenter

    I do science in the NW London area and although there is a reasonable amount of work, there are a lot of people chasing it. If you look on tutoring websites, you will see that university students and 'Uncle Tom Cobbley and all' are offering tuition at very low rates, and many parents go for the cheapest option. Of all the websites, the only one through which I have found work is Tutorhunt. Most leads go nowhere but this year, I have three GCSE students on the go.
     
    tsarina likes this.
  20. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    I work for a large tutoring agency in East Anglia - there always seems enough work to go round.
     
    tsarina likes this.

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