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Is Product Design GCSE/ A'level taken seriously by universities?

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by misfit, Jul 6, 2012.


  1. It was suggested
    to me today that some universities who run design degree courses do not rate
    Product Design GCSE or even A'level. They would far rather see students take
    more rigorous options such as Engineering or Electronics. Are schools doing the
    right thing by offering Product Design at GCSE or is it merely the easy option
    to get the best grades possible?

     

  2. It was suggested
    to me today that some universities who run design degree courses do not rate
    Product Design GCSE or even A'level. They would far rather see students take
    more rigorous options such as Engineering or Electronics. Are schools doing the
    right thing by offering Product Design at GCSE or is it merely the easy option
    to get the best grades possible?

     
  3. It is certainly not an easier option (AQA at least). It does provide a very broad range of knowledge and understanding which underpins the graduate courses. We have not come across any problems with our students securing places to study achitecture, PD, engineering etc. We do both GCSE and A Level and the design and make work is a high standard and so is the exam paper
     
  4. This is not true, it has been accepted by the importannt Russell group as a useful A level and is published by them as such. BUT Art and design isn't and sometimes this 'design' word causes confusion
    I suggest that you download their document ASAP
    http://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/informed-choices.aspx
     
  5. When I applied for a degree in Architecture I was told my GCSE and A-level Product Design wasn?t sufficient (Despite being told by careers services that I would only require either maths or physics and product design A-Level).

    Most universities would not except me without art (one wouldn?t even give me a prospectus!) because Design Technology isn?t creative or innovative enough. As a result I had to take up Art on top of my other subjects.

    So I would agree that some universities and courses don?t rate DT highly however if we can encourage more creativity and innovative projects and this can be shown in folder work for university portfolios there should not be a problem. Looking back at it now as a teacher I can see that my own GCSE and A-Level experience did not prepare me to be creative and innovative and I did struggle with these concepts at the beginning of my degree. Engineering etc would be different as its more technical so it is understandable they would have a preference Physics and Maths.
     

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