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Is it too easy to be 'off sick' in teaching?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by deleted358, Mar 5, 2009.

  1. I am asking this through a genuinely interested POV. I do not wish to dig at any particular poster or illness. I had 7 weeks off myself last academic year due to being signed off with an injury so I'm not being snide.
    I ask this as there are situations in RL where I feel some may take the biscuit. I know at least 2 teachers who never do a full week due to either their illness or their childrens. It is no exaggeration, they will have at least 1 day off a week. When should Occ Health get involved or is it just 'that is the way of the world'? If it was a child, the attendance officer would be asking for medical notes surely?

     
  2. I am asking this through a genuinely interested POV. I do not wish to dig at any particular poster or illness. I had 7 weeks off myself last academic year due to being signed off with an injury so I'm not being snide.
    I ask this as there are situations in RL where I feel some may take the biscuit. I know at least 2 teachers who never do a full week due to either their illness or their childrens. It is no exaggeration, they will have at least 1 day off a week. When should Occ Health get involved or is it just 'that is the way of the world'? If it was a child, the attendance officer would be asking for medical notes surely?

     
  3. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    I think the trigger for OccH is twelve absences or twenty days in a year - so they will already have been seen!
    This is of course flexible for cases like your own.
     
  4. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Is it?
    Funny enough,I'm reading this as I've just phoning in sick. I'm having a mint tea before going back to bed which is why I'm posting. I've spent most of the night in the bathroom,I'll spare you the details. Still,I got up,showered,got dressed. However,I got sick again. Should I have gone in?
    I'm hoping it's a 24 hours thing and intend to be back tomorrow.
     
  5. They haven't been seen, I know this for a fact. I referred myself to OH after my injury because it wasn't going to happen and I thought it should.
     
  6. This isn't the point of the thread! It isn't a dig at people. It is not about one off illnesses. I did say it wasn't a thread of critisism.
     
  7. I know what your trying to say Becky.
    It does seem that it is much easier for us too be off but I do feel that our job is one in which you have too be super fit.
    In other jobs you can kind of slink back in your desk and just work slower.Also if you are ill, then due to the volume of people you come into contact on a daily basis I think that sometimes your best off out the way?
     
  8. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    Not in all of them, though I do take your point.
     
  9. landaise

    landaise Occasional commenter

    Yes, it is too easy, I've had time off as my children were ill, in private companies, they'd dock pay for that!
     
  10. Yes, I think our profession is quite sympathetic to having time off. As I said on the other thread, my dad died recently and my sister (who works in an office) was expected back in 3 days, or she could take unpaid leave, whereas I was told to take a week and then see how it went. Turns out it has been pretty tough so I'm still off.
    However I agree with the previous poster that it's probably due to the nature of the job, I wouldn't want to downplay office jobs, but if it was a matter of hiding at my desk and not talking to too many people I think I'd be able to cope, or maybe serving people in a shop might be ok, or working on your own, but having a class and people in and out all day is hard. And if there are behaviour issues it can be a lot harder to deal with as your patience is low, and you might make the wrong decisions or react in the wrong way.
    So yes I do think it's easier to get time off in teaching. Having said that..... I have also worked in retail, and although it seems harder to take time off, they seem to be more flexible in working hours if someone needs to coe back gradually, or is struggling.. I think sometimes schools offer reduced timetables, but it must obviously be more difficult in teaching..?
     
  11. Whilst I agree, what concerns me is that in other jobs people don't have to pick up your work. In school, a fellow teacher has to cover your lesson! Where is the consideration for them?
    Again, I must stress, this is a genuine enquiry with no spite to anyone who has had to take time off. I am really thinking about those who abuse the system when I am talking about this. I feel too little is done to combat habitual absenteeism whereas if it were a child we would be calling in outside agencies.

     
  12. I think it's very easy to get sick in a school environment, where children are sent in sick,where colleagues come in sick, where schools are badly cleaned and are germ festering places.
    IMO teachers drag themselves in when they are not fit because they don't want to let children or colleagues down. I know I've done that, picking up bug after bug and succumbing when it was holidays. Since I left work 2 years ago I haven't had one cold or bout of sickness.
     
  13. I think in most office-style jobs, work is either not important enough to get done by someone else and can wait, or someone takes it over. Same as in school in my experience, someone has to take over because there are children who need supervising!
    But yeah, it is really annoying when someone is off constantly and others have to pick up for them. It's very different from when there is a genuine reason for someone being off. I have noticed some people have time off for their children who are old enough to look after themselves! However, apart from referring to OH, I'm not sure there's a lot schools can do about it.
     
  14. ian60

    ian60 New commenter

    I remember reading an interview with an air traffic controller who said that she felt no guilt at all about taking time off when sick because she had to be at the top of her game or else not do it.
    I appreciate that you can't leave 10 AG in an in box to be dealt with on a teacher's return but we aren't the only job, we just seem to lead the field in the guilt stakes.
     
  15. I agree. for most staff.
    At least once a week? Maybe these staff should re-assess their career based on their obviously very weak immune system!! [​IMG]
     
  16. Yes! there is nothing like it in the guilt stakes. Teachers do seem to have a massive guilt problem.
     
  17. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    It probably depends on how hot your personnel department is!

    Let's face it - in many jobs you can go to the toilet when you need to, we can't.
    If you've got a dodgy tummy, you just can't go. To work, that is.

    Not that it's particularly relevant to the OP.
     
  18. Dormant would describe it!!

     
  19. My husband works out of an ofice, although travels around fo rhis job. We have sometimes had same bug and he just cancels his visits, goes in and sits at desk quietly, drinking lemsip. He doesn't have to talk to anyone.
    On the same day I might have two bottom set year 10's goodness knows how many meetings etc. I think it is harder to be ill, as you can't just tell the kids to be quiet and let you be.
    In some ways it is harder, as you can't just "do your work another day".
    I have been ill a lot. The job is stressful, and you work long hours, in a germ ridden environment. I think that makes people more prone to sickness.
     
  20. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    Well there you go then - with nobody to refer them, the referral won't be made!
     

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