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Is it possible...

Discussion in 'Career clinic' started by SteveClark590, Dec 15, 2015.

  1. SteveClark590

    SteveClark590 New commenter

    Is it possible to work in some related capacity with schools, without having been a teacher?

    My background is in organizational learning, corporate learning, training & development, e-learning, ed-tech, and other knowledge transfer practices. However, I am not a certified teacher and have never worked as a school teacher.

    While the need for innovation in our schools is great, and the advances in learner-centric thinking in the business world would certainly be helpful, I have found no receptiveness by school districts to outside thinking.

    Does anyone know of a "path to usefulness" whereby an "outsider's" knowledge could effect improvement in our schools?

    Steve Clark
    http://www.mountainmoversatwork.com/ideas-in-action.html
     
  2. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    Steve - your link at the bottom seems to be advertising. This is not allowed, I'm afraid!

    And I also wonder if you meant to post on this UK site, as the wording of your post suggests that you are US-based . . .

    Best wishes

    .
     
  3. SteveClark590

    SteveClark590 New commenter

    Thanks, TheoGriff. Please don't be afraid. I am not advertising. The link shows more of what I have to offer in a knowledge, world-view-on-education sort of thing. Just supplemental info to augment how I see education differently than teachers. Guess I could have framed it in context differently.

    Thanks for the info on UK vs. US posting. First, I find US views on education innovation lagging behind UK and Aussie views. Second, if there is a thread, I didn't find it. Can you please direct me?

    Thanks.
     
  4. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    Definitely US!

    I haven't mentioned any thread, so am unclear what you wish me to direct you to . . .

    Best wishes

    .
     
  5. SteveClark590

    SteveClark590 New commenter

    Well, then I am not sure what you meant by this.

    I am very comfortable interacting internationally. Are you suggesting that I may have made a mistake? Perhaps my "US' English is a bit obtrusive? Should I disguise my writing with organise instead of organize?

    Perhaps you have a thought on my original question. Just looking for a bit of friendly career insight here.

    Thanks.
     
  6. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    I meant that if you are, as seems possible, US-based then I cannot give useful advice here as we are UK based.

    Sorry if that was not clear.

    Best wishes

    .
     
  7. SteveClark590

    SteveClark590 New commenter

    Ahh. Now I see. Thank you.

    However, I believe the US education system can learn a thing or two from Brits and Aussies on this type of thing. Do you have any business learning experts interloping into the school systems?

    If it isn't already happening in the forward-thinking UK system, then my idea and pursuit may be a lost cause here in the US system.

    Thoughts?
     
  8. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    Not any that I have noticed.

    Best wishes

    .
     
    sabrinakat likes this.
  9. chelsea2

    chelsea2 Star commenter

    Probably not helpful, but if you think the UK education system is forward-thinking compared with the US, i would hate to experience the US system ;).

    Just wondering why you think the UK is so forward-thinking?
     
  10. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    The UK has more than one education system.
    Your website certainly has enough jargon to impress politicians. It actually says very little.
     

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