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Is it acceptable to put a video of school shows on youtube?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by Smeddlesboy, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. Smeddlesboy

    Smeddlesboy New commenter

    I have set up an official school youtube stream for us to upload various official videos about the school. I've disabled all options for other users to comment on/rate the videos so that I can 100% control what happens on the site.
    My question is: do you think it would be acceptable to upload videos of school shows/performances to the youtube site? We usually video them, but nothing ever happens with the videos because staff/pupils neither have the time to edit them, nor the hardware to produce DVDs to sell.
    My gut instinct is that it would be acceptable to upload the videos to youtube so long as we notified parents/guardians that we intended to do this and gave them an opportunity to tell us if they did not want their child's performance on the internet. Do you agree?
    Also, my opinion would be that recordings of school shows from pre-2005 (when all pupils featured in them would now necessarily be 18+) would be fine from a nostalgia point of view
     
  2. Smeddlesboy

    Smeddlesboy New commenter

    I have set up an official school youtube stream for us to upload various official videos about the school. I've disabled all options for other users to comment on/rate the videos so that I can 100% control what happens on the site.
    My question is: do you think it would be acceptable to upload videos of school shows/performances to the youtube site? We usually video them, but nothing ever happens with the videos because staff/pupils neither have the time to edit them, nor the hardware to produce DVDs to sell.
    My gut instinct is that it would be acceptable to upload the videos to youtube so long as we notified parents/guardians that we intended to do this and gave them an opportunity to tell us if they did not want their child's performance on the internet. Do you agree?
    Also, my opinion would be that recordings of school shows from pre-2005 (when all pupils featured in them would now necessarily be 18+) would be fine from a nostalgia point of view
     
  3. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    Strongly Disagree. Minefield. Avoid.
    My last school's answer was (at the start of the year) to send a letter to all parents about how the school would use images and video of their children. As I had a multimedia responsibility I drafted that letter, and included the request that any parent disagreeing with its terms should notify the school in writing within X days of receipt. This was to avoid a lengthy (and futile) wait for consent slips to return. It went out with all the other start of term paperwork.
    We stated that in some instances we might film performances, and where appropriate might credit the cast. Such films might be offered to the performers and their families as CD or DVD souvenirs, and might be displayed within school (ie Open Evenings). We said we'd seek the specific consent of individual parents for any still images put on the school website.
    At no point did we contemplate YouTube, and I still wouldn't.
    Firstly, if we're trying to stop kids cyberbullying and illicitly filming and humiliating staff and fellow students online we simply haven't got a leg to stand on if the school is plastering video of them all over YouTube without their personal consent. Also - what if the parent(s) of one of the show's key performers objected? It's not like you can edit them out.
    Secondly, it's open to abuse - YouTube clips can be copied, re-edited, re-dubbed, captioned and posted again by anyone, especially outside the school community. I know souvenir DVD video could in theory, but it would be less likely, especially if the video is stored in certain formats. Putting stuff on YouTube is like an open invitation.
    Thirdly, some children have protection orders that prevent contact with natural parents or certain others. Some are transferred to new schools without informing immediate relatives who might harm them. There is a risk (albeit a small one) of a child in that situation being identified via a video posted on YouTube.
    Fourthly, if staff can't find the time to do a proper job of filming and editing performance videos they look utterly **** (ie one shaky hand held camera with audience's heads in shot and rubbish sound quality), and do no favours for the school's PR.
    I'd stick to recording and burning to disc, then selling them for a small sum to performers only, using a signed consent form that indicates the material will not be reproduced and redistributed in any way, shape, or form beyond the household's own computer.
     
  4. As long s you're careful, I think this can be a positive thing.


    Take the above seriously, as it's a very valid point. We have a similar 'opt-out' system, but we automatically opt-out looked after children with privacy concerns, etc. and if that person is in the footage then it doesn't get shown. This means that if one of the actors is on the 'do not publish images' list then the show will not go on YouTube.


    If you opt to make a policy to not post videos on YouTube then I'm not about to criticise you for that - it's a perfectly sensible response.
     
  5. Smeddlesboy

    Smeddlesboy New commenter

    Thanks for the replies so far - I am considering them both before I ask the council to make the final decision.
    For the record, not that it will influence how I view your comments, but it will help give me some background - magic surf bus, are you primary or secondary?
    To address a few points, IF i were to go ahead and do this, I entirely agree about having a list of pupils whose images could not be used under any circumstances (whether or not parents requested it) - and in those circumstances I would usually say publish nothing, rather than trying to edit them out. Thanks for suggesting that. Also we would need the explicit consent of all pupils too I think.
    Overall I'd still quite like to do it, but the main point making me think I shouldn't is magic surf bus's one that videos could be re-edited if they were in the public domain. However we have for many years put JPEGs of events up (again, only carefully selected ones) and have yet to have experienced a problem with that as we work within a clear policy
    Also re editing point, we have a vocational media team (of pupils) who could edit videos. We just don't have the facilities to burn DVDs
    Finally, what about the videos from 10+ years ago - do you see any minefields there, or do you think that should be safe enough? (given I'd remove anything if any of the pupils (now in their 20s/30s contacted us asking us to)
     
  6. Smeddlesboy

    Smeddlesboy New commenter

    Would like to emphasise that I'm not ignoring the good advice you gave me above - just playing devil's advocate trying to see all sides of the argument so I can properly get my head around it.
     

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