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Is defiance low level disruption?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by FrabjousDay, Feb 3, 2016.

  1. FrabjousDay

    FrabjousDay Occasional commenter

    As a relatively inexperienced (2 years) teacher I have a question regarding the behavior of a very difficult pupil at my school (thankfully not in my class) involving the following:

    • Routinely running out of class
    • Bullying
    • Tearing up books
    • Shouting at teachers
    • Defying teacher's instructions

    Parents have been spoken to a number of times (she has a very chaotic home life). Any sanctions we implement are ineffective, as she just runs away! We have just had a staff meeting where we tried to explain the situation, but our head responded that her behaviour was only 'low level' so there was not much she could do.

    My main question is:

    Is defying a teacher's instructions low level disruption?


    If so, things are looking pretty bleak!
     
  2. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Defying instructions such as 'put your pens down and listen' could be deemed low level.
    Defying instructions such as 'that isn't an acceptable way to speak to a classmate, stop now' or 'that's the fire bell, line up in silence please' is not.
    Running out of class is not.
    Tearing up books is not.
    Shouting at staff is not.

    Staff need to work together.
    Each time said child runs out of class, call for the head.
    Each time she is involved in bullying, refer to the head as per anti-bullying policy.
    Each time she destroys school property, refer to the head to organise a replacement.
    Each time she shouts at a member of staff, complete an incident form and pass to the head.
    If everyone refers everything to the head, every time, then the head will soon get the idea it isn't low level at all.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. cassandramark2

    cassandramark2 Lead commenter

    This is NOT low level disruption. I have extensive experience of pupils with behavioural issues. When I have had to cope with a pupil such as yours, I have reminded the HT about their responsibility in terms of safeguarding whilst dropping in the potential sh*tstorm from parents via the old Ofsted questionnaire (nowadays known as parentview). If you are in upper KS2, you might also raise the spectre of implications for floor targets.

    Apart from this, the girl seems to need counselling. Do you have a PSA who can intervene? She seems very troubled and could well be suffering from something like an attachment disorder. Read up on the behaviours linked to this. It could be that she needs professional help beyond the remit of a class teacher.

    PM me if you need any advice.
     
  4. FrabjousDay

    FrabjousDay Occasional commenter

    Thanks very much for the comments - it's good to know that this isn't something that should be tolerated.

    Each time said child runs out of class, call for the head.
    Each time she is involved in bullying, refer to the head as per anti-bullying policy.
    Each time she destroys school property, refer to the head to organise a replacement.
    Each time she shouts at a member of staff, complete an incident form and pass to the head.
    If everyone refers everything to the head, every time, then the head will soon get the idea it isn't low level at all.


    This is exactly what staff are doing, but when we do so the head often sends her back. Or the head tells the staff to implement a sanction e.g. staying in at break (to be honest, this is the only sanction she gets), which is ineffective due to her tendency to run away.

    Like I said, this isn't in my class, but I'm starting to worry about the teacher who has to deal with her, and the effect it's having on her.

    She seems very troubled and could well be suffering from something like an attachment disorder.

    Her teacher certainly feels that there's something going on, but unfortunately not a lot of help on that front either.
     
  5. cassandramark2

    cassandramark2 Lead commenter

    What does the SenCo say about all of this?

    As I said, safeguarding - one of the issues which can trigger a 'Special Measures' rating - seems to be severely compromised by having a 'runner' who is not being taken seriously by SMT.
     
  6. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    How often is the defiance happening? Where does she run away to? What does the head say when told she runs off from break time detention? What else does the head suggest for managing this child's behaviour? Does this happen when this child is taught by a different teacher? What year is she? What happened in the previous school year?
     
  7. FrabjousDay

    FrabjousDay Occasional commenter

    What does the SenCo say about all of this?
    Our SenCo left, and has been replaced by a member of SLT who believes it's low level disruption.

    How often is the defiance happening?
    Daily (very rarely there will be a well behaved day)

    Where does she run away to?
    The library, corridors, outside.

    What does the head say when told she runs off from break time detention?
    If the head says anything, she tries to give positive reinforcement and praises her for making good choices.

    What else does the head suggest for managing this child's behaviour?
    Refers to next steps, missing break, talking to parents.

    Does this happen when this child is taught by a different teacher?
    Yes. The child is consistently bad with everyone. I don't teach her, but at one stage I had to carefully try and close a door that she was slamming open and closed (after repeatedly asking her not to) When I told the head, her response was 'she's having a bad day.'

    What year?
    4

    What happened last year?
    She was bad last year, but appears to have got worse.
     
  8. JohnJCazorla

    JohnJCazorla Star commenter

    As this child appears to be a school wide problem could all teachers get together (especially if you have a Union Rep) and point out to the Head that all these issues need dealing with.

    The only catch is that you need to collectively agree to refuse to teach the child if this has no effect. Hopefully the threat (with potential bad publicity) will be enough to bring the correct outcome.
     

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