1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Is a masters necessary for a head teacher job?

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by laurafraser85, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. I have now been teaching in primary schools for what is now 4 years. I am assistant HOD and head of year 3 and 4 and would one day like to become a head teacher. I have been interested in doing a masters in educational management and leadership but I am wondering if this is necessary/helpful when you are applying for HT jobs? I've read mixed reviews online and can't seem to get an answer to this question. I am very interested in the course but of course don't really wish to spend £10,000 on something which is not really necessary.
    I understand that I need to get further experience in the classroom, in other roles within the school etc, but since my masters would be part-time and therefore would take a few years to complete I would like to start it asap if it would be worthwhile.
    Thank you in advance for you advice.
     
  2. I have now been teaching in primary schools for what is now 4 years. I am assistant HOD and head of year 3 and 4 and would one day like to become a head teacher. I have been interested in doing a masters in educational management and leadership but I am wondering if this is necessary/helpful when you are applying for HT jobs? I've read mixed reviews online and can't seem to get an answer to this question. I am very interested in the course but of course don't really wish to spend £10,000 on something which is not really necessary.
    I understand that I need to get further experience in the classroom, in other roles within the school etc, but since my masters would be part-time and therefore would take a few years to complete I would like to start it asap if it would be worthwhile.
    Thank you in advance for you advice.
     
  3. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    Not essential no. You might gain much in terms of your own academic development and preparation though from some continued study, if only to gain the rigor of time management and self study in readiness for headship.
     
  4. For head of a primary school? No.
    If you really want to do a Masters, get the headship first then have it as CPD and get the school to pay!
     
  5. Can I suggest shopping around for your Masters degree? I found some much cheaper and shorter online courses with similar content to the ones which cost £9000/£10,000 eg. Marjon in Plymouth and others. There was even one which gave 30 credits if you could show an NPQH certificate. NPQH has some use after all! Studying is a good thing to do and gives you some perspective + keeps the grey matter going.
     
  6. I did my masters in management and leadership, then NPQH, I then got my headship and really felt they help me.
     
  7. I did my Master through Manchester Metropolitan University completing in 1995 and if you could find the course that is similar to that I would recommend it. the course I completed linked theory with an issue in your current school and my school paid part of the course provided I discussed my assignments with them and shared what I discovered. I can't say that it is invaluable as a headteacher as I'm not one (my own children got in the way of my ambition) however it has meant that I am able to 'hold my own' when SLT dip into educational management theory to prove a point. I have done a number of NCSL courses on leadership I found the MSc. in education management far more use and still occasionally go back to bits of the theory I learnt even now, it is a while since I completed mine however I still think it was well worth completing. Depending on the type of parents your school has, a headteacher with a master degree can have PR benefits. It is also useful to put yourself back into the pupil role having taught for a while as I think it improved my teaching!
     

Share This Page