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Irreversible changes

Discussion in 'Science' started by Kaf80, Feb 5, 2011.

  1. Hi all,

    Might seem like a silly question but starting this topic in year 6 shortly. Most of the changes are quite obvious but I wasn't sure whether powder paint and water was a reversible or irreversible change?
     
  2. Hi all,

    Might seem like a silly question but starting this topic in year 6 shortly. Most of the changes are quite obvious but I wasn't sure whether powder paint and water was a reversible or irreversible change?
     
  3. sci84

    sci84 New commenter

  4. Thanks for your reply. I tried the link and it put me onto a blank page in Primary Resources.
     
  5. sci84

    sci84 New commenter

  6. Still no luck!
     
  7. sci84

    sci84 New commenter

    Looks like you need to copy and paste the above link into your browser rather than just clicking on it direct.
     
  8. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    If the rain falls on the masterpiece, the paint runs off the paper. Reversible.
    I bet if you evaporated the water from the powder paint and ground the residue you could rehydrate it. Reversible.
    I still remember the day back in the Plantagenet era when my year 4 teacher caught me making coloured clouds by blowing in the pots of dry powder paint. She was exceedingly vigorous, and I didn't to get any painting that day, but the increase in entropy of the paint was a joy to behold and I have not yet repented.
    P
     
  9. Not only would that be awful, but I think you meant IRreversible! Fortunately, most (old) masterpieces were done with oil paint, so this wouldn't be a problem. However, if it was a watercolour painting, you might be able to rescue and reconstitute the paint, but not the painting.
    Any activity which involves DISSOLVING is a reversible process: classic examples are salt and water, sugar and water, ink and water. Why not try making proper coffee, evaporate the solvent (water), grind up the remnants then rehydrate with boiling water and see if your "instant" coffee tastes as good(?) as Nescafe (other brands are available)? Just check with elf&safety for hygenic glassware before you start. Also beware hot surfaces, etc, etc, etc.
     
  10. blazer

    blazer Star commenter


    There was an American TV prog where he did things like this. It wasn't mythbusters but something along the same lines
     
  11. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    I used too few words to make my meaning clear. What I meant - as PSY has stated that paint running off the poster paint masterpiece meant that the answer to the OP's question "Is making poster paint reversible or irreversible" was reversible.
    P
    I bet rehydrated coffee the way you describe would not be so good as before.
     

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