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Ipads in School

Discussion in 'Primary' started by hollyoconnor32, Jan 31, 2018.

  1. hollyoconnor32

    hollyoconnor32 New commenter

    Hi,
    I am a student and I need some help with one of my research modules at university.
    What are your opinions on using ipads in school and which ways would be useful and have the most impact to discourage the use of technology for more tactile, hands on learning?
     
  2. elder_cat

    elder_cat Established commenter

    Hi @hollyoconnor32 ,

    I suspect the 'opinions' you are asking for will vary from one teacher to the next, based on what subject they teach, and at what level . I don't teach any more, I'm retired, but I did look into the possibiity of using iPads for some of the units I taught at College. I formed the view that they were not really feasible for the units I taught. iPads are useful, but I think there are certain subjects or topics which don't really map well to the iPad.

    You could also read up on the issues encountered when a large school district in the US attempted to roll out a major project based on students using iPads.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-la-unified-ipad-settlement-20150925-story.html

    I am not sure what you mean by this? I don't quite see how using iPads might have an impact, in terms of 'discouraging the use of technology for more tactile, hands on learning'? Or are you asking for example of areas where the use of iPads has been dropped in favour of a different approach, with no 'technology' involved?
     
  3. hollyoconnor32

    hollyoconnor32 New commenter

    Thank you for your reply, yes I am interestes in where more outdoor, hands on activities, both independent and involving students interacting with each other. Yes that's where I am asking, how technology has replaced worksheets, games and activities etc. As I feel students and children use enough technology at home, school should be a place where they come away from this.
     
  4. elder_cat

    elder_cat Established commenter

    I think replacing things like worksheets with computers can actually help in some respects, for example not having to collect them all and hand them back when marked. But games and activities that don't involve technology might help children to develop their inter-personal skills.

    I imagine not all children have the same level of access to the same range of technology at home. But I think it's not uncommon today for children to spend more time on social media or gaming, than they do actually socialising with other family members.
     
  5. sparkleghirl

    sparkleghirl Star commenter

    I've worked in a couple of 'ipad' schools. It can help, but I admit most of the use I made of them was simply in sharing material with the classes. There are some good apps for science and I've done science lessons with children using (individually or in pairs) Phet simulations.

    However, I'm baffled as to why schools opt for ipads when there are more affordable things out there which will do the same job. Is it fashion? Emperor's new clothes?
     
  6. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Imovie being the best app that others don't have.

    Tbh, the best bit about iPads is the ease at which they can be quickly used for research, AR tests, photo evidence. Other apps are great too (green screen, garage band, ttrockstars, various presentation apps etc.).
     
    mrajlong likes this.
  7. ElizaMorrell

    ElizaMorrell Occasional commenter

    All the schools I've worked in have had iPads.

    It makes no sense. They're expensive to buy and maintain, the functionality can be lower than other tablets, and the main thing they're used for is accessing website games, or a few apps. All of that can be done on cheaper tablets.

    Schools need to buck the trend, buy different tablets and use the saved money for more useful apps, or individualised literacy/maths programs that children can access on the tablets and progress through (Lexia/IDL etc.).

    I know that there are some apps which are only available on Apple, but if a large proportion of schools changed over, the app developers would be forced to launch their apps on android as well.

    Life advice in general: don't buy Apple products. Overpriced, underfunctional, designed to fail after a certain amount of time so you have to buy the newest version (admitted by Apple last year).
     
    Grandsire likes this.

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