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introducing halving numbers.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by slippeddisc, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. slippeddisc

    slippeddisc New commenter

    I am a bit baffled about how to introduce halving numbers to year 1. They can halve shapes and objects and know the sides have to be equal but they have no idea about halving numbers. They are getting quite good at doubling small numbers. How would you introduce halving?
    Objects e.g. cubes or counters?
     
  2. slippeddisc

    slippeddisc New commenter

    I am a bit baffled about how to introduce halving numbers to year 1. They can halve shapes and objects and know the sides have to be equal but they have no idea about halving numbers. They are getting quite good at doubling small numbers. How would you introduce halving?
    Objects e.g. cubes or counters?
     
  3. I always find that it helps the children if they have a very strong solid understanding of doubling as '2 lots' of a number rather than the misconception of adding a number to itself.
    With year 1 I would give them a range of numbers and matching towers of cubes then ask them to share the cubes between themselves and a partner into equal amounts to find half.
     
  4. slippeddisc

    slippeddisc New commenter

    Thanks.
     
  5. daisymoo

    daisymoo New commenter

    Definitely use objects so that the children can put them into two equal groups. Presumably you introduced the halving of shapes as cutting the shapes into two equal shapes so it should be straightforward to link this to the halving of groups. I introduced halving by reading a version of Jack and the Beanstalk in which Jack's mother threw half of the beans out the window; the children then used beans to find half of different numbers. We then linked their findings to their knowledge of doubles. Towers of cubes work equally well because it is easy for the children to compare the towers to check that both halves are the same.
     
  6. rosievoice

    rosievoice Star commenter

    This age group often find the concept of halves rather difficult, but do understand fairness. They often don't give a darn if little Johnny has 6 cubes and they have 4, but they do mind if little Johnny has 6 chunks of chocolate and they have only 4.
    Therefore half of a 10 chunk bar of cadburys is 5 because it is fair. I find that the use of smarties or other edibles focuses the infant mind better than counters!
    Prepare paper strip number lines with vertical divisions. They can go up to any number you like, so long as they are cut out accurately, (eg don't let them slice off part of the ends). Fold the number line in half, something that should be relatively easy, and mark the crease with a felt pen. Bingo, half of 8 is obviously 4.
    Half = sharing between two, so draw two large spacehoppers onto whose tummy region things can be glued, fixed, dropped, etc and it will be obvious if one spacehopper has more things than the other. Stress fairness. Good luck.

     
  7. slippeddisc

    slippeddisc New commenter

    Went brilliantly today, even with those who I thought wouldn't understand it. The concept of being fair worked a treat. Thanks everyone.
     

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