1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Introducing flash cards

Discussion in 'Primary' started by anon4582, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. Have you introduced flash cards to help children in their daily activities?
    What is best - a print image picked from those found on the net, or a photo of the child?
    How many do you use? What sort of things do you use them for?
    Have you seen any improvements with the children when using them?
    All feedback welcome.
     
  2. Have you introduced flash cards to help children in their daily activities?
    What is best - a print image picked from those found on the net, or a photo of the child?
    How many do you use? What sort of things do you use them for?
    Have you seen any improvements with the children when using them?
    All feedback welcome.
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    What exactly do you mean by 'flashcards'?
    I use flashcards all the time to introduce vocabulary in MFL/ spelling/ learning to read.
     
  4. Sorry, maybe 'flash' was the wrong word to use! :)
    I meant prompt and activity cards, giving visual support. Routine pictures for daily tasks such as getting changed etc...
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Visual time table?
    Instruction cards?
     
  6. Yes :)
     
  7. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    They undoubtedly work for children who need them, if you see what I mean. And easiest to produce using symbol software. You can use text/text+symbol/symbol only. If you make a grid 1 cell deep and as many cells wide as necessary for the sequence, you can write a word or drop a symbol into each cell and get the whole lot to a consistent size very easily.If you don't have symbol software, you could do the same in Publisher using ClipArt but the appearance of the whole won't be so uniform. The children do need to be aware they work from left-right!!! If that's too hard for them, then I've seen people put individual pictures on a flip-chart sort of arrangement. Then you flip a card over after each action to see the next thing to do. Or you can Velcro them to a board which is extremely time-consuming and the cards get lost easily.
     
  8. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Visual time table & Instruction cards work particularly well for children who have special needs. I use personal visual timetables to carry with them & one enlarged one in the classroom for other children to help them refer to.
     
  9. yes, an absolute must for children who struggle to process verbal information or have short term auditory memory. I use them for everything and anything and it definitely works. The only reservation I would have with using symbols is that I found the symbols for EYFS activities are not visually representative e.g. sand, water tray etc. In this instance I found photos much more relevant and therefore didn't need the additional layer of learning what the actual symbol means.
    A visual timetable is an excellent way for a child to make sense of sequence.
     
  10. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    Our school is trying to get dyslexia-friendly status and all classes have to have a visual timetable. We also have to use the same programme, so that the pictures are clear and uncluttered, and that children moving from one class to another are familiar with the symbols. We use "Communication in Print".
    The visual timetables are mainly aimed at children with dyslexia, and other children (eg some on the Autistic spectrum) who get anxious when they don't know what's happening to do. But they are also popular with other children. My Reception class like looking at the timetable and trying to work out what's going to happen during the day, when they first come in and are waiting for the register.
    We use the programme to make up other resources as and when we need them eg "Good listening", "Good sitting" prompts etc
     
  11. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    I'm not sure how I managed to write such gibberish. It was supposed to say "don't know what's happening next."
     
  12. Excellent
    Visual timetables are a popular use [​IMG]
    What about the instruction cards - is there anything in particular you use them for? I know each child is different, but have you found certain cards are used more than others?
    Thanks [​IMG]
     

Share This Page