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Interviews - we're not teaching, so how to wow them?

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by star_bright, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. star_bright

    star_bright New commenter

    And also
    1. Do they talk salaries at the interview? Is it a negotiation there and then?
    2. Are you offered the post on the day?

    Generally looking for any advice, thanks
     
  2. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Salary can be discussed at interview, but it is not normal to negotiate, the school - if it is decent - will have a salary scale based on experience / qualifications. So, if the salary is suitable for you say yes, but be wary of any schools willing to negotiate.
    If you have an interview and they offer the job during the interview, you have to question whether there were any other candidates; if not, ask yourself why not.
    Otherwise,on technique tips. Let your knowledge and understandin of gud teching guide yu..
     
  3. 1. I've never discussed salaries at an interview - I've always known the salary scale going in and it has never been up for discussion.
    2. I've been offered the post on the day twice. In both cases they had pretty much decided to employ me already before the interview and were just making sure I wasn't a complete freak before confirming it. In one case I asked at the end of the interview when they would let me know and they told me the above (we'd all flown to Thailand to meet so obviously they were reasonably interested as was I although I didn't end up taking the job).
    In the second case it was a skype interview and they told me at the start they'd decided on me presuming the interview was satisfactory. I thought that was an odd recruitment technique but they'd spent literally a few hours talking with my referees beforehand so I guess they felt they knew all the dirt. The interview consisted of an hour of me asking them questions (can I bring my cat? where is the closest swimming pool?...) because they said they knew enough about me already. I took that job and it worked out really well.
    Inceidentally I've never taught as part of the recruitment process. I'm not sure how much that happens outside the UK.
    While I do think the process described above was rather odd I also think it is important that you remember at interview that you are making a choice as well. It should be about finding out if the school is a good match for you, not just about you impressing them.
     

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