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Interview

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by Mackem85, May 2, 2012.

  1. Mackem85

    Mackem85 New commenter

    I have an interview for a post next week. I have had a couple of interviews for roles so know how they work. However, the lesson I need to teach for this one is a bit strange, its to teach "an introductory lesson for people who may wish to take your subject in 6th form". It's left it really open as to how I do this. Therefore, I was confused whether to teach a lesson as normal, or whether I would need to outline how the course is structured, content etc
     
  2. Mackem85

    Mackem85 New commenter

    I have an interview for a post next week. I have had a couple of interviews for roles so know how they work. However, the lesson I need to teach for this one is a bit strange, its to teach "an introductory lesson for people who may wish to take your subject in 6th form". It's left it really open as to how I do this. Therefore, I was confused whether to teach a lesson as normal, or whether I would need to outline how the course is structured, content etc
     
  3. That is unusual, but it seems fairly straightforward - think about what students need to know to make an informed decision about their subjects. Then ignore that and sell your subject shamelessly :p
    In all seriousness, you have to assume that you are actually being placed in front of Y11 students that the department wants to recruit for the subject. I don't know what subject area you're in, but you'd want to have:
    A) an information session:
    - What sort of subject it is (eg History: Hard, well-respected humanity: learning factual information, writing essays, critical analysis)
    - Quick summary of the modules, topics covered, how it's assessed (how many exams? How long? Sat when?)
    - What skills students will develop over the 2 years
    - What degree courses it'll help them to get onto
    - What sort of career paths people with this A-Level could take
    B) an engagement session:
    Some form of activity in which the students get to "do" the subject for a little while - equivalent to the most fun / offbeat lessons they might do during the A-Level. Eg Maths: some form of investigation, or an algebraic sorting task, trying to find whether statements such as "2x=x+4" are always true, sometimes true or never true...
    Or for psychology, 2-3 working memory tests and a class discussion of the implications of the results found.
    Then a quick summary at the end covering the top 2-3 salient points on why your subject is one to strongly consider.
    That's what I'd do, anyhow.
     

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