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Interview via a webcam

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by Silent85, Jun 7, 2011.

  1. Silent85

    Silent85 New commenter

    Has anyone had a interview via skype etc? what is it like and what sort of questions do they ask?


     
  2. Silent85

    Silent85 New commenter

    Has anyone had a interview via skype etc? what is it like and what sort of questions do they ask?


     
  3. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    Oh, the usual: Experience, teaching philosophy, are you really wearing pants (and why do you have a whip hanging on the wall behind you)?
    Actually the few I've had have been pretty close to what you would expect in a typical face to face interview. The technology can be something to worry about, but just take it stride with a sense of humor. I've had the video cause the call to drop out so we ended up with just audio eventually (twice actually).
    Prepare as normal, dress as you would for a face to face, practice if you can and set up somewhere you are comfortable with nothing distracting (or embarrassing behind you).

     
  4. Haha yes I locked my cat outside! The alst thing I needed was him bringing in some dead animal or...a live bird....urrrrrrrrrrgh!!!
     
  5. Even though I have over 20 years of teaching experience, I subscribed to Joyjobs before going international. I like Igor's attitude and advice. To wit: "The shine should be on your shoes, not your forehead." He suggests we wash our faces with soap and warm water to avoid a greasy-looking appearance, and to shine our shoes. He suggests that it makes us look and feel more professional and therefore we'll act more professionally. He even says that we should follow this advice for a Skype interview for the same reasons, even though no one can see your feet. You know they're there, and if they're tucked into recently shined/polished shoes, you just might present yourself better than someone sitting there in his/her underwear or slippers.
     
  6. Well there was some dithering about the shoe issue, but I just felt weird and uncomfortable wearing shoes in my house...so I didn't. And it must've been ok because I did get the job :)
     
  7. Dave. Who took the photo of you in front of the whiteboard? I preferred your relaxed, but authoritative sailor outfit.
    Think you are wrong about this video interview. I wouldn't even wear slippers as another poster posted; what if the interviewers asked to see your footwear.... [​IMG]
    Devil's ad. What will happen when they ask to vid con the referees?
    And lots of piss poor teachers working in them. I hate sick notes, lazy and incompetent teachers. Some of the boogers manage to fit all three bills! There is no such thing as a perfect school. I work in a school with a good rep (though ISR and the occasional ex-staff nutjob shout otherwise), but we still have our share of 'could do better' sorts..
    Sorry, digressed. Be smart, hide the whips, don't say 'guys', 'kids', 'dudes' or 'man' or tell the joke about the nun and the rubber chicken.
    I like the gin and tonic idea, though.
     
  8. Well done. Have another G&T. Did you see what they were wearing on their feet?
    Slight concern - they offered you the job at the end of the vid con interview?
     
  9. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    Dude, like everyone, I've heard the one about the bar of soap, but not the rubber chicken. I'm sure most of us guys would like to hear it.
     
  10. There is no joke. It just sounds like there should be one.
    I am still interested to know if the video interviewee was offered the job on vid. Should this be sending out a warning sign?
    Two nuns in the bath. One says "where's the chicken?" The other says "don't know - have some soap." [​IMG]

     
  11. Noooooo .... what's the difference between a nun and a woman in the bath?
    Well, a convenient advantage of SKYPE interview is that you can stick "post-its" all around your pc/laptop screen with your answers to anticipated questions, points or questions you wanted to ask. Your interviewer isn't going to see them or detect slight eye movement - or might just think your a bit cross-eyed. [​IMG]
     
  12. Spice0012

    Spice0012 New commenter

    Silly question but for international jobs don't school like to observe your teaching or is it just a formal interview. Sorry for daft question. [​IMG]
     
  13. I would think it highly impractical for international schools to observe teachers teaching, unless they are already teaching in the same country. I've had three interviews for international schools and I wouldn't have described any of them as formal in any sense. I've had far more severe interviews here in Canada. Mind you, it seems Brits like their formality a lot more than Canadians.
     
  14. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Hence the lack of Canadians working in international schools...[​IMG]
     
  15. One has bad habit?
    If you are reading an answer it would be obvious. When I was asked if I had questions at a live interview, I got my sheet of A4 out and went through them. Nothing wrong with that.
     
  16. In the Brits schools, perhaps. There are few Canadian schools that only allow those trained in one particular province (the one I'm going to included). It certainly helps keep the pool of applicants down.
     
  17. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    Actually the first school I taught at overseas had American in the name, but we were definitely in the minority (Canadians drastically outnumbered us) which wouldn't have mattered, except they were mostly nasty and bitter people (which I would have expected from Americans overseas but was surprised at for some reason in Canadians).
    Also, the whole concept of an interview lesson is not very common in the US, although I can see where schools would find it advantageous.
     
  18. Believe me, there are plenty of bitter Canadians working in schools in Canada. I'm all for exporting them, particularly if they are masquerading as Americans (isn't it usually the other way around?).
     
  19. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    Yes, and this was back in 2005, so we only semi-joked about sewing the maple leaf to everything we owned as a safety precaution.
     
  20. No I didn't...maybe I should ask in the future!!
    I was offered the job a couple of days later, not immediately after.
     

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