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Interview Questions - I have been given some good ideas

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by mmm...Milk, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. mmm...Milk

    mmm...Milk New commenter

    I was on a regular jolly to the job centre yesterday and saw a chap from "next steps" career advice service. He has e-mailed me a list of 41 questions to ASK at interview as well as a ton of other stuff on questions they may ask and preparing for interview. Not all of is relevant to teaching interviews, but there are some really good questions that are relevant.
    If anyone is interested, please PM me and I will endeavour to send them to you!
     
  2. mmm...Milk

    mmm...Milk New commenter

    I was on a regular jolly to the job centre yesterday and saw a chap from "next steps" career advice service. He has e-mailed me a list of 41 questions to ASK at interview as well as a ton of other stuff on questions they may ask and preparing for interview. Not all of is relevant to teaching interviews, but there are some really good questions that are relevant.
    If anyone is interested, please PM me and I will endeavour to send them to you!
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Thank you!
    But I will tell you that there should be some caution here.
    As a rule of thumb, questions that are used to impress the panel usually don't; they just annoy us.
    You could probably get away with one along the lines of: What opportunities would I have to set up a Physics Olympiad? (For Physics teachers, obviously!). But you should really have got your keenness about this over in some other part of the whole process.
    You should therefore only ask (a) questions to which you really need to know the answer in order to decide whether to accept or not the job (b) just one, max 2.
    I have known candidates keen to impress with their questions who actually lose themselves the job at that point . . .
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  4. mmm...Milk

    mmm...Milk New commenter

    Thanks Theo - some of them seem a little odd. I don't think many of us would ask "how do I compare to the other people you have interviewed so far?" or "what misconseptions do people have about the organisation (or school)?" Even can you describe your ideal employee!!
    I am going for a training post interview / assessment, through a large company, and am busy researching the company and what they do as much as possible. . I have a scenario based interview, a presentation that will be assessed (no idea in advance) and a written task.
    There is so much advice out there, and it is quite confusing, you just never know what they are looking for. Some of the info I have been given does conflict slightly with yours Theo, but I trust your experiance more as you have seen it from the appointments pannel side, which is very useful! I don't want to annoy the interviewers, but equally do I need to practise what I may be preaching if I get the job? I am getting myself in a knot again. Argh.
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    The problem is that so many of these advice thingies are American-based or at the very least Business-based, and school appointments aren't like that.
    At one of my 1-2-1 training sessions, a candidate showed me his normal personal statement for a school leadership post. I said "That would impress me - if I were looking for a senior manager for BP". Turned out that he had paid for advice from a HR company that deals mainly with the international firms in oil industry and similar!
    So you are spot-on correct, Mmm, in being wary of some of those questions!
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  6. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    This experienced secondary (state) head agrees completely with the even more experienced, secondary (independent) head Theo about this.
    I've seen candidates annoy the entire panel with stupid, 'asking it to try to look clever' questions. I've also seen candidates make themselves look daft by taking out a list of questions they could either (a) have found the answers to in the pack they were sent or (b) asked during their tour of the school and/or meeting with HOD.
    As Theo says - ONLY ask questions to which you need the answer there and then. Only ask one or a maximum of two questions.
    You might well find people who disagree with Theo and me on this. It's unlikely they'll be headteachers, however.
     
  7. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    :)
    Yes, although I don't really claim that Middlemarch and I are the World's Experts On Everything (just ask Mrs TG - she wouldn't let me get within a mile of a claim like that!), I do sometimes have a little giggle when people who have never sat on a selection panel for teacher appointments give their view that we are wrong.
    Doesn't happen often, mind you.
    :)
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     

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