1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

interview lesson on the significance of the peasants revolt

Discussion in 'History' started by EGOODMAN1, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Hi everyone,
    Ive got an interview next week, and the topic ive been given is :
    the peasants revolt: why was it a significant event in the middle ages
    it is for a yr seven class , i have emailed if they have done any background work on it, but not reply yet, the lesson is 30 minutes long, and im struggling to come up with any ideas! any help would be much appreciated. Thankyou.
     
  2. Hi everyone,
    Ive got an interview next week, and the topic ive been given is :
    the peasants revolt: why was it a significant event in the middle ages
    it is for a yr seven class , i have emailed if they have done any background work on it, but not reply yet, the lesson is 30 minutes long, and im struggling to come up with any ideas! any help would be much appreciated. Thankyou.
     
  3. This one interested me, more for my own planning for next year than anything else. Your prospective school may have an interesting take on what is a tired old topic that gets stuck in narrative and sources. I don't know if any of this is relevant to you but it might help. I'm working on the assumption that it should be significance rather than consequence.The best line might be to keep 1381 against other revolts - 2011 is the obvious link. I am not constrained, of course, by 30 minutes.
    Question: when Adam delved and Eve span, who was then the gentleman?

    Gentleman. How old was Richard II in 1381, how much older than Y7? Some green kid, no police, no riot shields, no tear gas, outnumbered 2000 to 1 by revolting peasants, he leads them quietly away like lambs to the proverbial. Quite a stunt. Significance: how do elites continue to get away with it? They are outnumbered. But leaders are trained: our present lot in the great public schools. Richard learned his trade through hunting, tournaments and managing 200+ servants as a boy. Richard's own self confidence was unusually linked with his own status as an ‘anointed king’, religiously empowered. Significance of confident leadersip facing down of the lower orders. It might be tempting providence to mention it but how do teachers pull it off with odds of 20+:1? Richard saw the peasants lacked leadership? Revolution knows where it is going but revolt soon withers when confronted - sounds like some lessons.

    Eve. Spinning is quite fun actually. The reality was Eve was up to her sorry knees in agricultural work: a couple working their 7 acres, plus 7 for their lord. (OK that's SE England, different field systems elsewhere). Eve couldn’t make bread at home, had use the lord’s miller, baker, brewer, smith. Needed permission to marry. Widowed, needed permission to remarry, or, more expensive, to stay a widow. Lords pick spouses. Some Y7 might know peasant farming from overseas and understand 5 hectares with oxen, the sheer grind every day. Some might know Black experience. So, does Eve let Adam go out and riot on the streets? Does Eve pitch in herself or stay home with all the little peasants? Adam might not come home. You never know, Eve might even fancy the clogs off some New Adam. Anyway, significance of women’s decisions in conflicts: more sense than the men? Y7 will have an opinion for 2011 and 1381 may not be so different after all.

    Adam. Plodding through fields to feed your own family is one thing, keeping knights and abbots in idle luxury really cheeses you off. The poor village priest mutters the same thought (Jack Ball and his sermon, Joe Stalin?). Priest might lead, peasants have the odd sickle and club. How do we contact other groups: medieval tweet? Give it a go, and hope London’s ruling class panic, or just go for it anyway and make your point? They might get a fright and lay off the brothers (for a while). Any Poles in that class? – elicit something about 1410?, not long after 1381, and they beat the Teutonic Knights. The English are wimps, their 1381 was unusual. Poles are a serially revolting bunch, Jeszcze Polska nie zgin??a, Kiedy my ?yjemy is their line and it's a dogged determination. Significant issue of why, while most people keep their heads down, others go for revolt. Again Y7 should have something to say. Lech and Solidarno?? at Gda?sk? A very ordinary bloke and he got there in the end.

    1381 and all that. “Our” narratives. English kids, English adults for that matter, know little and care less about pheasants in 1381. For Slovaks, their national story is deeply significant to their identity. Jane is clueless about 1381; Wojtek knows 1410; Jock gets 1314. I cannot really see that the sources are significant but might be worth a mention. Empathy might run better with Empathy might run better with Y7: feel Eve’s pain? When that revolting peasant cut off the archbishop’s head, how did he feel? (The peasant). Is parading a severed bleeding head round the East End a hate crime? Does nailing the bishop’s mitre back onto his bloody head constitute a ‘religiously aggravated’ hate crime? Sentencing was “robust” in 1381 (judges are giving it welly now) but should judges ‘up the tariff’ to deter revolting oiks? It isn’t so easy to work an LGBT angle on this one. There must have been closet priests but for unfree peasants, lords made marriage compulsory since a small household could never farm 14 acres. So, significant ‘equalities’ issues in PR and the opening question is one huge stereotype. It helps to tick all the boxes.

    Good luck!

     

Share This Page