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Interview Lesson Observation - We're going on a bear hunt

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by rhodes11, Apr 29, 2011.

  1. Hi
    Just a quick message to see what people think about my idea for a 10 min lesson with 10 reception children for an interview observation. Any opinions/ improvements would be appreciated.
    I am going to read We're going on a bear hunt (obviously) to finish of I was going to take in a kind of sensory bag with bottles of water with pebbles in (river), bags of leaves for them to crunch (forest), bag of chocolate pudding for them to squish (mud) and maybe a bottle with polystyrene balls in for them to shake or a snow globe (snow storm). And generally just get the children to talk about how the objects feel and what they are doing..
    So what do people think a job winning session?
     
  2. Watmore

    Watmore New commenter

    I always get the kids joining in with some hand actions when I read this. Hand up for over, hand down for under shake both hands for swishy swashy...etc good luck.
     
  3. What about going on a role play hunt with the children, exploring the movements as you re-enact each part of the story? The children would be using the repetitive phrases of the story too.
     
  4. I think you're trying to hard,.
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Just what do you think you will do when the bag of chocolate pudding splits open? And what are you hoping the 10 children are going to learn from all this potty gimmickry?
     
  6. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    As a matter of fact, I have. I've worked extensively in special needs across all phases and know a lot more about teaching in EY than the average secondary specialist.
    But I'd expect any teacher planning an observed lesson to go into it with a learning objective or objectives.
     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    So you will know that teachers often provide sensory experiences as part of the continuous provision with open learning intentions that are dependant on how they are used.

     
  8. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I do - but this is for an observed 'bit' of a lesson for an interview. Foolish not to context it and give it LOs.
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I agree
     
  10. I really agree with Msz...and if it's not Bear Hunt it's Handas Surprise!! to use these books in an interview situation shows very little original thought or ideas from the candidate ...just an ability to google!! This links with another current thread about students and others asking for advice for the simplest of things..I agree with Sadika ..how did we manage when we had no internet to rely on! Of course it is good for more experienced teachers to help the newbies but at some point they must show what THEY can do for themselves...we have interviewed some very unprepared candidtes recently and how they will cope with an NQT year I do not know!!
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I would also avoid the Very Hungry Caterpillar and The Rainbow Fish
     

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