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Interview help.

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by johnteacher, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. Hello I have my first interview next week.
    My lesson has to be one hour long, how do I differentiate for my lesson?
    I rang the school and spoke with the class teacher, who just said they are the lower set for maths ( two form entry school im assuming the must mix classes for literacy and numeracy)
    Any advice please?
     
  2. Hello I have my first interview next week.
    My lesson has to be one hour long, how do I differentiate for my lesson?
    I rang the school and spoke with the class teacher, who just said they are the lower set for maths ( two form entry school im assuming the must mix classes for literacy and numeracy)
    Any advice please?
     
  3. If the school wants proper differentiation then they need to give you more information than that. Such as: SEN details, current working levels, what topics they have recently completed (especially if you are building on previoius lessons rather than giving a completely standalone lesson), literacy levels, seating plans (are they grouped within the class according to ability?).
    If you have this information, then you can differentiate properly. Without it, the best you can do is have your work ready and then provide support work for those who struggle and extension for those who do well - but you won't know who needs what until you see how they do in the lesson. Getting the right starter will, therefore, be key.
     
  4. Just realised that I forgot to say (although it's kind of implied) that you should get back in touch with the school and ask for this information (and anything else you think you may need). Explain your reasons and they can then decide.
    If they don't give it you then a) they've seen how seriously you've taken the interview, b) they have an idea of how you WOULD differentiate, c) it's a good talking point in the actual interview and d) hopefully they'll lower their expectations in terms of differentiation to something more realistic (this is, I've been told, quite common when someone is overseeing interviews for the first time and doesn't fully think things through).
     

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