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Interview for first NQT job but haven't taught for 9 months...help!

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by j_pink, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. j_pink

    j_pink New commenter

    As the post explains I have not taught for an academic year but really want to be red hot and get this job!
    Does anyone have any tips as to what could make a strong start to the lesson (they're a rowdy bunch of Year 11's) and how to settle them. I'm thinking an engaging starter should do the trick.
    What happens if the behaviour goes terribly wrong?
    The school is big on students demonstrating the progress they have made. Any ideas on how I can get every child to demonstrate they have made progress? What if they haven't? Aaaaah!
    The lesson is GCSE Poetry. Thank you!
     
  2. j_pink

    j_pink New commenter

    As the post explains I have not taught for an academic year but really want to be red hot and get this job!
    Does anyone have any tips as to what could make a strong start to the lesson (they're a rowdy bunch of Year 11's) and how to settle them. I'm thinking an engaging starter should do the trick.
    What happens if the behaviour goes terribly wrong?
    The school is big on students demonstrating the progress they have made. Any ideas on how I can get every child to demonstrate they have made progress? What if they haven't? Aaaaah!
    The lesson is GCSE Poetry. Thank you!
     
  3. anonymousarty

    anonymousarty New commenter

    Do some song lyrics as a starter.

    Get them to look for (and underline) examples of metaphor, simile, assonance and alliteration. Then get them to unpick the track - I used If I Were A Boy by Beyonce. I got them to look for any examples of sexism in the lyrics and talk about who the "voice" might be - didn't like men, but not strong enough to leave him.
     
  4. anonymousarty

    anonymousarty New commenter

    Finished the post early!

    Good luck.
     
  5. Either:
    1. Give them all some post-its. Get them throughout the lesson to write down one thing they have learnt. Bring them up and stick to board/wall/whatever. As your plenary, read out selected ones and discuss them. This has the merits that, if they all write "nothing" you can make some up...
    2. Issue them all with levelled outcome grids. Get them to write an example of each level that they feel they've achieved as they go. In the plenary, get them to identify where they are. Tbh, I've done this in maths, but I don't see why you can't do it in other subjects.

    Good luck!
     

  6. the goth mother
    I really like this idea I am primary trained and think this would work really well with the children I work with. Thank you for your wonderful idea.
     
  7. Re: thegothmother - Absolutely fantastic idea. I'm a PGCE student for MFL and have my first interview on Wednesday next week - just trawling the forums for advice and came across this idea. It will be fab for recalling vocab and showing that students have learned something and can also be differentiated - i.e. giving students more than one post-it in order to stretch them for more vocab.

    ¡¡Muchas gracias!!
     
  8. Yeh, good in alot of situations. thankx
     

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