1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

International Schools in Sweden

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by biologist, Feb 19, 2011.

  1. Hi,

    My wife and I are looking at moving to the Malmo/Helsingborg region in a few years time with our son. I teach secondary science, and I'd want to work in an international school (rather than a state/voucher school) to begin with. I have a few questions i'd like to ask anyone with experience of living/working in the schools in the area:
    1) What is the salary like in the international schools? (I'm currently out in the middle east - so I know the wages will be less than here!)
    2)How comfortable would a family lifestyle be? (We plan to buy a property outright with our savings when we get there)
    3) How important is it to know Swedish? We do intend to learn, as we want to settle there
    4) How expensive is it to get and run a car for a young family?
    5) How much do you lose in taxes?
    If you have any other advice, please let me know!
    Thanks!
     
  2. Hi,

    My wife and I are looking at moving to the Malmo/Helsingborg region in a few years time with our son. I teach secondary science, and I'd want to work in an international school (rather than a state/voucher school) to begin with. I have a few questions i'd like to ask anyone with experience of living/working in the schools in the area:
    1) What is the salary like in the international schools? (I'm currently out in the middle east - so I know the wages will be less than here!)
    2)How comfortable would a family lifestyle be? (We plan to buy a property outright with our savings when we get there)
    3) How important is it to know Swedish? We do intend to learn, as we want to settle there
    4) How expensive is it to get and run a car for a young family?
    5) How much do you lose in taxes?
    If you have any other advice, please let me know!
    Thanks!
     
  3. Tigger1962

    Tigger1962 New commenter


    Well if you are ruling out Free schools and state schools wheremost internation children are educated you will be pretty limited -surely there is only Bladins in that area?The international schools are mostly popular with parents on temporary assignment in Sweden. Most long term parents tend to choose one of the free billigual free schoolsas kids attending international schools are often unable to attend University in Sweden as often the Swedish teaching is not of a high calibre

    Salaries are pretty variable and usually individually negotiated

    Sweden is not really a country wherepeople live the highlife -but enjoy the more relaxed way of life wherekids can still play out or walk to school and where parents can still be home at a reasonable time to go fo a swim in the sea or lake after work in the summer -or a ski in the woods in winter - however it will be better than for most as most people pay a substantial amount of salary is spent on accomodation -if you are rent free then this will be a huge advantage
    TV licence 170
    Cable TV/Broadband/phone approx 300
    Food 4,000-??
    Drink 700-
    Transport -depends on where you live- public transport is good ifyou live near to it
    Childcare -subsidised - max 1260kr/month for fulltime child care with discounts formore than one child
    Child benefits 1050kr/month for 1 child/ 2250 kr/month for 2 children
    Parental leave - up to 480days - even if you never worked in Sweden you can get 180kr/day


    Depends what type of caryou have in mind
    Petrol prices are rising with world oil prices at the moment
    Most families have a car though -unless living in central Stockholm where parking costs are huge


    It depends partly on how much you earn and where you live
    - you don't pay state taxes until you earn over 31,000per month
    -salary up to this level pays local authority (kommun) tax - usually has a nominal rate of 31-33% - but the effective rate after working tax allowance is around 25%
    - VAT is higher at 25%
    -however you can also get tax relief on interest paid for mortgages, loans and credit cards etc
     
  4. Tigger1962

    Tigger1962 New commenter

    OOPs-I missed the question on learning Swedish

    Obviously it is important to learn the language - there are a variety of public and private lessons - SFI (Swedish for Immigrants) is free and run by the local council -or you can get private lessons from private adult education colleges such as Folkuniversitet

    However for Teachers it is soon to become more important - Sweden is setting up its own teacher registration scheme whereall teachers employed in any school receiving money from the public purse (including free schools) will be required to have A level Swedish (gymnasiet Svenska B) or the TISUS testas a condition of registering.Schools will not be allowed tooffer permanent orlong term contracts to teachers who do not meet all registration requirements
     
  5. Thanks for that - all in all, it doesn't sound too bad. I think that I can cope with the languages issue - thats just one of the normal challenges of international teaching!
    <ol>[*] I know you mention Bladins, but what about the Int School in Helsingborg? Is that public or private funded? [*]I've looked at house prices and I think the south offers good value. Are there any other areas that I should consider (apart from the South)? I think Stockholm is a bit out of my league in terms of houses, but I'd be happy to go anywhere for a good quality of life. The ME can be a bit of a bubble to live in, so it would be nice to see the real world![*]Would you recommend state funded over private? Why?</ol>Sorry, so many questions!

     

Share This Page