1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

'intent to resign' cayman islands vs job secured???

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by kirstysufc, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. Hi everyone,

    I was all set on moving to china, final decision by Sunday. I have a job at a nice small school with a great supportive headteacher who has been amazing through the recruitment process. However, just as I'm about to accept I get contacted from the caymans asking me if I'm still available and interested for a position there.

    I basically dug and asked the hr how many positions to short-listed candidates. Her response was that they had one 'intent to resign' as their deadline for resignations hadn't yet passed. But that I was a strong candidate and there were only 3 candidates all together.

    Now does this mean that this person may not even leave? Other people could resign? I'm almost certain i'm going to take the risk as seeing this job was what made me consider international teaching in the first place.

    What would you do in my situation? And does anyone have a knowledge of how the cayman system works?

    Thanks

    Kirsty
     
  2. Hi everyone,

    I was all set on moving to china, final decision by Sunday. I have a job at a nice small school with a great supportive headteacher who has been amazing through the recruitment process. However, just as I'm about to accept I get contacted from the caymans asking me if I'm still available and interested for a position there.

    I basically dug and asked the hr how many positions to short-listed candidates. Her response was that they had one 'intent to resign' as their deadline for resignations hadn't yet passed. But that I was a strong candidate and there were only 3 candidates all together.

    Now does this mean that this person may not even leave? Other people could resign? I'm almost certain i'm going to take the risk as seeing this job was what made me consider international teaching in the first place.

    What would you do in my situation? And does anyone have a knowledge of how the cayman system works?

    Thanks

    Kirsty
     
  3. You can never truly know what can happen. Applying to the CI might be the best decision you will ever make. It could also be the worst (life in paradise is reportedly not all what it's cracked up to be). What I would say is that if you feel happy about the job you have already secured, then you should probably keep it. Even putting aside the fact that you have committed already and that to renegade on it would not be very nice vis a vis your new HT, a job secured is better than the promise of another, even a potentially better one.
    I am in very similar position to yours. I have been offered a job in a very good school. I have accepted it, even knowing that it is quite possible that my dream school could also offer me something in about six weeks. Even if they do, I will turn it down since I have already committed to something else.
    And well done on getting offers or interest from schools, it's a tough market out there.
     
  4. Yeah I see your point. I haven't actually confirmed the offer with china so wouldn't be doing anything wrong. I have had 4 offers, two I decided I didn't want. One in Qatar I read bad reviews on and then this one I like in china. But, as I say the whole idea of international teaching came from caymans. I just don't want to end up with nothing. I have one day to decide, so difficult.
     
  5. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Dear OP, crumbs you've been offered a job in China - how exciting - and with a head teacher who has impressed you during the application stage. Take the job and enjoy the experience. What's that saying about a 'bird in the hand'?
    Too many getting greedy on here recently. Get along to the 'unemployed' or 'supply teacher' forums and be happy you are in work, as I'm sure most of them could do a job as equally as well as I can.
     
  6. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    This isn't even two in the bush, it's one flying around and hasn't decided which bush to land on let alone whether go near the bush yet.
    OP is clearly green with a hanger-on boyfriend in tow. Goodness knows who these schools are offering her posts (perhaps more of the same like the one in Qatar).
    Caymans isn't so fabulous. Expensive but without the renumeration to go with it. A good friend of mine was there a few years ago. He couldn't wait for his contract to finish; really not every one's cup of tea.
     
  7. katycustard

    katycustard Occasional commenter

    I'm a Cayman fan, was there for five years and have been back in the UK for 18 months. Having said that, it's like everywhere with good, bad and inbetween.
    The only thing about the job and HR is Cayman operates on Caribbean time, which is nothing like you've known before. You could still be getting phoned in July to ask if you're interested in the post! I used to appoint teachers there, and HR would sort out various dates for phone or face to face interviews and then other things would take priority (sometimes Hurricanes, sometimes not!) and the interviews would be re-scheduled for days/weeks ahead. Othertimes we'd be emailed asking if we could be available for interviews later that day. Trying to get 5 senior people together at such short notice was often impossible. If you get your offer for China I would go for it, only because the Cayman position might not be any clearer in a few weeks time.
     
  8. Thanks Katy. I took the brave(or crazy) decision to chance it on the caymans. Supposed to have an interview next week so hopefully it goes ahead. I'm going to apply for some others as well just incase 'island time' kicks in. I'd regret not knowing if I would have been offered the job more than turning down a job and not getting the caymans. Do you know what is meant by 'intent to resign' letter?
     
  9. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Blimey, you turned down the China job offer? Ok I guess if you have a post at present but very brave if you are out of work. I'm in the far east and personally think there is no better place to be.
     
  10. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    Do expect to see
    the post advertised again before (if) they make you an offer.


    In the current
    climate you may rue the day you turned down a job, especially with your personal
    circumstances.</font>







    </font>
     
  11. No offence mister but you know nothing about my circumstances. I didn't ask for a personal attack on me, I asked for advice. Saying they will readvertise rather than employ me is not very helpful or fact based. I'm not going to bother posting on here anymore as people seem to want to insult people and hinder rather than help. So much for supporting colleagues in a professional, helpful manner.
     
  12. katycustard

    katycustard Occasional commenter

    No, sorry. I would guess that someone has written to their Principal, HR or the Education Dept saying they intend to resign and not renew their contract. They have until the date their contract comes up for renewal to change their mind.
     
  13. While MM has a reputation for being a bit harsh and cutting on here from time to time, this ain't one of 'em. He was not insulting and did not attack you personally.
    You asked for advice, and he gave you advice. He pointed out that in the present job climate, turning down a good job when you are encumbered (trailing spouse) is rather risky. It is a fact that a lot of schools prefer to hire (cheaper) single teachers or teaching couples. Getting in a snit is not going to change that fact.
    Schools that receive a low number of applicants also tend to readvertise to try to get a wider field from which to choose a lucky punter. As a recruiter, MM also knows this. If you were a gob-smackingly outstanding candidate, maybe a school would choose to hire you rather than cast their net a little wider. But let's face it. With a dependent, in an expensive place, you are handicapped.
     
  14. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Some (mostly young & inexperienced) folk are so tetchy nowadays'; thanks Sid.
     
  15. renesavi

    renesavi New commenter

    Hi Katy
    I applied for a job in Cayman in January and I haven't heard anything back yet does this mean I wasn't short listed. I really wanted the job. Thanks
     
  16. mattieg22081

    mattieg22081 New commenter

    I didn't think MM's response was in anyway insulting. It would appear this lady was only hoping to hear positive feedback about her choice to turn down a job where she was obviously in sync with the principal for the *possibility* of a job in the Caymans. An interview doesn't guarantee employment. I hope for the posters sake this doesn't turn round and bite you on the proverbial backside
     
  17. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    Considering that the OP faced this dilemma 6 years ago, I trust that they have probably discovered whether their choice was wise or not by now (and hopefully recovered from MM's supposed insult).
     
    dumbbells66 likes this.
  18. 576

    576 Established commenter

    Not at all. I applied in December and they didn't interview me till June. Unless contracts have changed they only have to give one month's notice. When you say you really want it. I hope you've researched the school's and not just looked at pictures of Rum Point.
     

Share This Page