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Inspiration needed!

Discussion in 'Music' started by fuzzycat, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. I'm a secondary teacher stuck in a rut - seem to end up spending all my time trying (and largely failing) to get KS3 kids to play in time with each other, either playing or composing something on the keyboard, and them performing at the end of the lesson. I need inspiring ideas to engage them more, while not being anything too outlandish as behaviour can often be tricky.
    What's the lesson activity that works best for you, that you are most proud of and gets the kids learning and having fun? I only have keyboards (and voices) as resources, and those can be unreliable sometimes too... I just feel I have gone stale and I'd love some new ideas!
     
  2. I'm a secondary teacher stuck in a rut - seem to end up spending all my time trying (and largely failing) to get KS3 kids to play in time with each other, either playing or composing something on the keyboard, and them performing at the end of the lesson. I need inspiring ideas to engage them more, while not being anything too outlandish as behaviour can often be tricky.
    What's the lesson activity that works best for you, that you are most proud of and gets the kids learning and having fun? I only have keyboards (and voices) as resources, and those can be unreliable sometimes too... I just feel I have gone stale and I'd love some new ideas!
     
  3. Have you tried simple things like music theory jigsaws? There is a maths programme that you can adapt, it's free to download. Helps for revision of basic fundaments, you can input whatever you want onto it. Race to finish, winning group gets *insert prize here*.
    http://www.mmlsoft.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=11&Itemid=12
    Go to Formulator tarsia installation package near the bottom of the page.
    Other things I do can be a bit more 'out of the box' and might not work if you have behaviour issues. Ideas for musicianship lessons would include: -
    - Ear work/singing. I take a football in and we use it for chord building (they have previously studied how to build basic major/minor, an array of sevenths/major and minor sixths, sus2 and 4 etc). Person holding the ball sings the tonic and holds while they throw it to the next who has to add on the next note and then onto a third person etc.
    - As above but building a human piano. There are lots of games to be played with a human piano, chords, scales, intervals. If you have reluctant singers you can sing it yourself and get them to just signal that their note is being played.
    - Interval/chord building using glasses and water. Put them in teams, give them a list of intervals or chords to make, a set of glasses, a jug of water and a spoon to hit them with (you'll need to check the sets of glasses you give out beforehand to ensure they stretch to the pitches obviously). They work their way down the list, you tick off as they have completed each chord/interval. I normally will double with 2 of the group of 4 working on a quiz and then rotate them to ensure they all do all of the exercises rather then weaker students being pushed aside on the water task.

    Is this the sort of thing you mean?
     
  4. How about rapping, singing or drumming? Or minimalism?! I'm doing an ostinAto/tubular bells thing at the mo and they seem to like it! Now it wouldn't be suited to everywhere though!
     

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