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Information Processing problem

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by willowleaf, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. We have just had a new child (upper KS2) enter our school and found that Mum has not been entirely truthful with us when we recieved file and found this was his 4th school and one previous he had had to leave. This in itself is not a problem but although a clever lad (passed 11+ this year) he is clearly not fulfilling potential. A report I have found from ed psych says he has serious information processiog problems but doesnt say in which areas or what can be done to help. We feel that this is leading to his behaviour problems so before he starts the downward spiral in our school we are looking for interventions and support that would help. I am a bit at a loss does anyone have any ideas. Sorry if it is really obvious but only been senco for a matter of weeks so not very confident at present
     
  2. We have just had a new child (upper KS2) enter our school and found that Mum has not been entirely truthful with us when we recieved file and found this was his 4th school and one previous he had had to leave. This in itself is not a problem but although a clever lad (passed 11+ this year) he is clearly not fulfilling potential. A report I have found from ed psych says he has serious information processiog problems but doesnt say in which areas or what can be done to help. We feel that this is leading to his behaviour problems so before he starts the downward spiral in our school we are looking for interventions and support that would help. I am a bit at a loss does anyone have any ideas. Sorry if it is really obvious but only been senco for a matter of weeks so not very confident at present
     
  3. I was working with a boy (age 8) with a processing problem as part of Aspergers' and also Dyspraxia (gross motor).
    I tried a new programme called Bal-A-Vis-X (bought the DVDs and worked through them). To my surprise positive things started happening
    There are lots of mid-line crossing exercises. The frequency and rhythm of the exercises really helped the processing speed.
    www.bal-a-vis-x.com





     
  4. Contact the Ed Psych who wrote the report - or, if not in your area, contact your own school Ed Psych for some advice. They should be able to give you some general advice and recommendations on supporting pupils with these types of difficulties.
    In the meantime, here are a few strategies which I have previously suggested to schools to help them support pupils with information processing difficulties (including poor working memory skills and slow processing speed). I'm sure you're already doing some of them, but maybe others might be new:
    • Allow the pupil extra practising time to learn basic skills and facts
    • Show, rather than explaining verbally, what he needs to do to complete tasks
    • Use visual cues to support understanding and progress (for example, writing each step of a set of instructions in a different coloured pen)
    • Break down tasks and instructions into smaller components, so there's less to try and remember and process in one 'chunk' (this might cause less anxiety - we all know how trying to mentally juggle too much/too big a task can descend into panic and stress!)
    • Give additional structured support for processing difficulties (particularly towards the end of the day when the pupil's cognitive resources are likely to be exhausted)
    • A quiet, calm environment without visual or auditory distractions will be beneficial for the pupil to allow him to process information more quickly and effectively
    Strategies should be built into all tasks and activities (including those focussing on social/emotional learning - not just academic lessons) for maximum benefit.
    HTH. Hope your new role goes well - don't worry about not being too confident, you shouldn't feel you have to 'know it all' magically. And do make use if you can of your school's support agencies like Ed Psych, Learning/Behaviour Support, etc - that's what they're there for [​IMG]
    (from a final year doctoral trainee EP)
     

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