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INFLEXIBILITY OF THE HNS REFERRAL SYSTEM

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by Lilyofthefield, Feb 12, 2011.

  1. Pangar, you've been banging on about this for years.
    The situation seems to be that you believe that you know better than the people who are treating you. But that doesn't give you the right to accuse them of incompetence just because they aren't (a) saying what you want to hear, and (b) acknowledging your greater expertise.
    If you want a more pliable and acquiescent practitioner, put your money where your self-belief is and pay up to see a private specialist. Though I should warn you that even then, there's a risk that their training, judgement and experience may make them unwilling to do just as you ask simply because you think it might work.
     
  2. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    Why didn't you ask before you left?
    They didn't 'fob you off' with PALS they are there to support you through the process of a complaint.
    From your other posts I actually think you have been given very good care by the NHS and I doubt you could begin to pay what it has actually cost.
     
  3. I ask; they don't answer. As for paying for private treatment, with what shall I do that? I also think it is ridiculous that some of us have to work so much harder than others to get the treatment that we require. I usually have to go all around the houses a few times over, as proved to be the case when getting a somnography and a fitted mandibular device. Am I missing something here?
     
  4. I do wonder, Pangar, why you are so convinced that you are victimised by the NHS. I think someone has already said that many of us have very bad experiences. For me, they made a mistake in operating on my sister that eventually lead to her death. I still rely on the NHS though, because I think they are our best option.
    Do you speak as you write? Maybe if you concentrated on being clear in explaining your symptoms and had your questions written down it would help. I am afraid that much of what you write on here doesn't really make sense.
    I do object to you claiming that some have to work harder than others to get treatment. I think this is unlikely, and particularly in your case as I imagine you are one very squeaky wheel.
     
  5. I also think it is ridiculous that some of us have to work so much harder than others to get the treatment that we require
    It isn't only down to you to dictate what your requirements are.
    For a start you've based your assessment of what your needs are on what? Google? The NHS isn't a supermarket. Services are limited by funding and regulation. If you paid privately you still wouldn't necessarily get the treatment of your choice.
     
  6. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    Do you have another appointment with the psychiatrist? You could ask to be referred to psychotherapy then.
    You could post what it is on here and see if anyone has had it or go see your GP or go see a pharmacist. You are likely to be labelled non compliant if they have recommended a medication and you won't even try it. I find it hard to believe that if you asked him to talk about the side effects that they just ignored you.
    The NHS have done something, you are the one choosing to ignore the professional advice given to you.
     
  7. Non-compliant, moi? I've munched my way through barrels of sedatives of one sort or another yet all I have to show for it, to date, are a weird array of side effects and an ever diminishing return in terms of restfulness, for those around me as well as myself.
    Yes, I have asked for psychotherapy. I hope that my GP can secure it, and I am equally hopeful that rejigging the dosages of some of the aforementioned sedatives around will work. This is not to say that the time wasted with a scattergun approach to dispensing pills is anything less than shameful. And as for the other matter whereby accepting any treatment of this sort is a de facto professional suicide letter, methinks that this 'caring profession' protests too much about the extent to which it makes allowances for those who break rather than bend, for whatever reason.
     
  8. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    Where did anyone say that??
    Psychiatrists generally give out medication and monitor its impact, so I'm not sure what else you were expecting.
     
  9. What more can you expect? Well, more thought being given to the likely effects and side effects might be a good idea, for a start. A greater sense of urgency wouldn't hurt either. To borrow a phrase from the DM, I think it might be better if more effort was put into keeping Humpty Dumpty off the wall than bawling torrents of crocodile tears when he inevitable falls of it.
     
  10. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    And have you been to the pharmacist and GP like I suggested?
     
  11. The person who prescribed them will be perfectly aware of the side effects. If you didn't enquire at the time, I find the internet a fruitful source of information. The patient leaflets for almost all UK prescription drugs are on there.
     
  12. Being a stereotypical man, I tend to explode rather than implode when put under too much stress. When I was younger I used to be able to channel that 'nervous energy' into work or study but now it has started to have the same effect as poison.It also bears repeating that I do appreciate the responses that collegeagues have made, especially those with direct experience of the problem.
    I will speak to a pharmacist asap, as suggested (although NHS Direct proved surprisingly useful on that acount). For some reason I am reminded of a young woman in my local chemist shop asking for the morning after pill only to be ensnared in a conversation, in public view, about her being on the pill, forgetting to take it and now requiring a fall back. I suspect that the pharmacist in question might be Catholic.
     

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