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Increasing Childrens Vocabulary

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Purplepasta326, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. Purplepasta326

    Purplepasta326 New commenter

    Just finished target setting and realised that the next step for alot of the children (particulary boys) is toincrease vocabulary choices to make work more lively. Other than reading what ideas have people got for this. Was thinking along the lines of possible have a daily scrabble game??
     
  2. Purplepasta326

    Purplepasta326 New commenter

    Just finished target setting and realised that the next step for alot of the children (particulary boys) is toincrease vocabulary choices to make work more lively. Other than reading what ideas have people got for this. Was thinking along the lines of possible have a daily scrabble game??
     
  3. Play word association games, upleveling sentences (keep adding description to a very simple and boring sentence to make it more interesting), use a theasaurus (sp>!?!) where appropriate.
    Don't make them use lots of descriptive language all the time though, otherwise you have the risk of work losing any meaning because it is too heavily descriptive.
    Increasing vocabulary would also include technical/subject specific language too - so in science/geography, learning technical vocabulary that links with their topic work etc.
    JSY x
     
  4. If you send me a private message with your email, I'll send you some ppts that might help.
     
  5. For scrabble, one needs to know the words ...
    How about making a class thesaurus with a different focus each week. Get children to find words they don't know (something they often don't admit) and find other words that are of the same family whether it be meaning or type(?) for example, field could have paddock, meadow, pasture - all slightly different in a samey way. Sycamore - add any tree names they know plus a few more. Do colours (which include metals and gems) ('Hailstones and Halibut Bones' (are white) is a book of great colour poetry ), movement words - from trudge to hurtle, loiter to scamper, sound words etc. and have the lists visible on the wall.
    Or have a large body of words with headings above spaces-for-writing-in underneath and they write the words in the spaces according to meaning, necessitating looking up the ones they don't know. paddock willow emerald scuttle etc
    Field words Colours Movement Trees
    Hope this helps.

     
  6. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    For every set of specialised topic vocabulary I suggest you make a grid of about 12 words <u>with pictures</u> (made with symbol software for example) which you can check, spell, make sentences with, use for revision, send home... It's a bother the first time but, if topics come round regularly, it's worth it.
    Along the lines of the Thesaurus suggestion, it is quite fun playing against the computer's Thesaurus. In Word, if you type a word and then use Shift+f7 you will get the entry come up with synonyms and what part of speech it is and an antonym if available. The game is to predict what will appear for quite ordinary words. A few turns regularly will give a body of words you can keep a list of and quiz the kids about another day with a challenge to remember to use a few in their work when appropriate.
     
  7. Some years ago I had an A level English student who was totally baffled by these lines:
    "He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:"

    She didn't know the meaning of captives, or ransoms; of course coffers was Greek to her.
    I quickly realised that she didn't know the meanings of many words that are used everyday conversation.
    Where do you start with someone like that? Her GCSE results qualified her for an A level course but her ability didn't.She couldn't work out the overall meaning of the lines even when she'd been told the meanings of individual words.
     
  8. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    How depressing. The work must begin with Early Years teachers not talking down to children for fear of mot being undrerstood.
     
  9. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    or not, even.
     
  10. I'm an NQT so no expert by any means, but I have tried a few things with my class (mixed R/1/2) to increase their vocabulary.
    For a literacy starter we have tried looking at opposite words, and thinking of all other words which mean the same thing. Eg. Start with BIG and SMALL, and then brainstorm all the other words with the same meaning, we ended up with a long list on the board. This also links into discussions about the words 'Is gigantic bigger than enormous?' for example.
    Also at lunch time, I have been starting a story, then each child adds a line, and I encourage the children to think of interesting words to use.
    And thesaurus activities for Y2 to fill the odd few minutes if they have finished their work.
    Dreamer
     
  11. swim

    swim New commenter

    I have a literacy resource box at the back of the classroom and every literacy lesson the children are encouraged to find a resource that will help them with their writing. In the box are word lists, each one with a different theme, eg, one sheet says 'said' with three lists of alternative words, one for each ability level. Another list is one on feelings, another on movement. And so on.
    I also have a range of pictures which the children are encouraged to pair up and describe using the most outlandish words they can think of. This helps them think 'outside the box' so to speak. Another activity is to describe the pictures in the opposite to what they are seeing.
    It takes a while for the children to become used to fetching a sheet to use and for some a buddy is needed to help with the reading, but overall it helps make thier writing more interesting.
     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    have you seen this from lancashire ngfl ?
     

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