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In need of inspiration...

Discussion in 'English' started by emreynolds, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. I'm trying to plan a lesson for Y7 which will get pupils to identify some of the changes to the English language which happened in the Industrial Revolution and compare it to Modern English.
    I wanted to set it up as a fun investigation activity with various documents (making use of the British Library) which the pupils had to use to infer why changes might have happened and then think about how these changes are emulated or absent in our current modifications of language.
    Although I'm undecided on my main activity, I would ideally like them to do some writing which they could then refine at a later. I also need to make sure my secondary focus is reading skills and I'm not sure if it's prominent enough in my current (probably misgued) idea.
    I would appreciate some thoughts!
    Thanks!
     
  2. I'm trying to plan a lesson for Y7 which will get pupils to identify some of the changes to the English language which happened in the Industrial Revolution and compare it to Modern English.
    I wanted to set it up as a fun investigation activity with various documents (making use of the British Library) which the pupils had to use to infer why changes might have happened and then think about how these changes are emulated or absent in our current modifications of language.
    Although I'm undecided on my main activity, I would ideally like them to do some writing which they could then refine at a later. I also need to make sure my secondary focus is reading skills and I'm not sure if it's prominent enough in my current (probably misgued) idea.
    I would appreciate some thoughts!
    Thanks!
     
  3. The exercise is a lot more difficult that you seem to think.
    There are differences between Victorian and modern English, but they are subtle, and very hard for someone without a training in linguistics to describe or define. Obviously you can count new words (a dictionary will tell you when each word was coined), but going beyond that leads you into all sorts of difficulties. The problem is that the children ,and probably also the teacher, don't have the technical vocabulary to talk about the different types of sentences.

     
  4. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    Hmmm. Technically we've been in the "Modern English" period for hundreds of years. From the start of the Victorian era, grammar change has been minimal compared with the changes from Middle English. Of course, the vocabulary has changed greatly (partly through Indistrial Revolution features).
     
  5. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Is there a reason why you have to compare using Victorian English?
    If I do the development of the English language, I usually do a quick look at 'Old' English -eg Beowulf , 'Middle' English eg Gawain & Green Knight, Chaucer, then Shakespeare, as the changes are much more evident. You could then move on to Victorian English & they could see how much easier to read is English, the nearer to today it is written.
     

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