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Improving Learning in Mathematics

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by dsheehan13, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. Hi Folks

    Improving Learning in Mathematics or the standards units box has been recommended to me if one wishes to improve the teaching and learning in their classroom. Has anyone out there used this resource and if so what did you think of it?
     
  2. Hi Folks

    Improving Learning in Mathematics or the standards units box has been recommended to me if one wishes to improve the teaching and learning in their classroom. Has anyone out there used this resource and if so what did you think of it?
     
  3. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    Most people trained in the last 5 years will have been forced to look at it at some point, I'd expect.

    It's pretty good at identifying a range of potential misconceptions and helping you recognise them... The resources have some value as activities if you're the kind of teacher (or perhaps are being observed by the kind of teacher) who likes that sort of thing (and are working with a group of kids who don't like doing much work).

    It's well produced, has value, so it's worth spending some time going through. Downside, from my point of view, is that it's pushing a type of maths teaching I fundamentally do not believe in. The notion that kids learn from "activities" when, in my view, they learn from "practice".
     
  4. Hi dsheehan, this has been one of the best forms of CPD I've had. I found it inspiring in terms of getting the kids to actively participate in the lesson whilst still maintaining high levels of mathematical thinking. It's based upon the findings of Malcolm Swan's research in to effective teaching. These findings are reported on in the box, so I felt prepared for going away and continuing to develop and improve my teaching. I believe they used to be buried somewhere on the NCETM website but I've found them more easily here, http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/default.aspx#math_learning which has links to the booklets and DVDs which came in the original box.
     
  5. Yes, Standards Unit and Malcolm Swan are both very interesting. The resources won't be for every group but they can work very well with classes. Google 'Mathematics Assessment Project' for some further work by Swan. Paul DG: agree that a certain amount of repartition is essential but all lesson, every lesson?
     
  6. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    Practice is always necessary, but some things are best taught/ "learned" through relevant activities - the best way to actually appreciate what a kilometre actually is is to walk three times round a football or rugby pitch (whichever happens to be on the grounds), not just blindly trying to teach that a kilo means "thousand"...

    So I think we're a bit more in agreement than perhaps my first reply suggested.
     
  7. Cheers Everyone, appreciate the fact that you took the time to reply. Very useful info and agree with PaulDG, practice is always necessary, but some things are best learned through relevant activities.
     
  8. Agreed! I have to admit that I use different approaches according to teaching group. With experience, I've tended to use a bit more of a 'discovery' approach, though I would be the first to admit it sometimes feels a bit like going round the houses.


    If I recall correctly, the Standards Unit originated in the post 16 sector and to some extent that shows through. Worth a look though...
     

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