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Improving attendance - suggested whole school strategies

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by davidbrockhurst, May 28, 2011.

  1. Hi
    My school needs to review it's strategies on how to improve whole school attendance.
    It needs to gain the 93+% threshold i.e. rise by 2-3%.
    Any suggestions - radical or traditional - as long as they have proved their effectiveness.
    DB
     
  2. Wow, your year 9s are really keen on their colouring-in!
     
  3. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    What if the kid is not there on Monday morning or they don't turn up till after registration?

    It is usually a couple of kids in each class who are responsible for most of the absence. Punative measures taken against them and their families is what is needed rather than tasks carried out by everyone in the hope that they might get the message.

    Plus better admin. When I took over my yr10 class 2 years ago it contained a pupil who had stopped coming to school in year 9. She remained on the register until half way through yr 11. During that time she was responsible for 3% of my weekly absence. Even in weeks where everyone was there my form could only acheive 97% attendance. A colleague's form had 3 such puplis meaning he could never achieve higher than 90% attendance according to the school data system. These were pupils who had gone beyond any sanctions the school could impose yet the school, their year group, their forms and their form tutors were penalised! No amount of colouring in charts was going to make a difference to the figures.
     
  4. Morninglover

    Morninglover Lead commenter

    Well, it seems strange to me to even considering punishing those who do what you want (turn up) rather than those who don't...

    Still I doubt very much if any pupil gave a stuff about 'memos of congratulation'...Now 'gift vouchers'...maybe!
     
  5. I hear you on that. My Tutor Group has the worst attendance of the Year Group. And I get it in the neck every month. I have an in-built potential 10% absence. One pupil has a congenital heart defect meaning she is often in intensive care. One has sever Scoliosis and is often unable to attend due either to pain (the school chairs make it worse for her), or she is in hospital. The third has severe OCD with regard to touching anything that isn't clean. All diagnosed and confirmed by their doctors. So I get it in the neck for non-attenance.
    The 'winning' tutor group gets a BIG box of sweets each month. Mine have given up. We can't win. Now, or in the future. The head insists that no staff member can go through thresholds without contributing to whole school targets, and all tutors have to achieve 95% for the year to reach their targets. So I can't go through the thresholds. So I don't even bother. Some tutor groups acheive 100% attendance every now and then. My best has been 93%. My tutor group actually gasp when we have 100% attendance for both AM and PM registration on any one day. It doesn't often happen.
     
  6. You really need to get in touch with your union. You can not be held directly responsible for the attendance of specifc pupils. They can not stop you progressing when there are medical cases that hinder pupil attendance/ achievement. I am the attendance leader in our school and I know that there is nothing that you can do to affect this change. You need to show your Head the data to show that you are celerating success but can't make a difference with these 3 children. You could suggest that these pupils are given their own target. For the ones that are in hospital frequently you could suggest a pupil specific target of say 50%. If they get 95% of their target (47.5% attendance) then you have both achieved the target and your Head can't complain.
     

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