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I'm UPS but job is advertised as MPS

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by yorky, Jan 18, 2019.

  1. yorky

    yorky New commenter

    hi, I've gone through the threshold and have been on UPS for years , currently as a supply.
    I've seen a job advertised that would suit me but it is advertised as MPS.
    If I got it would I only be paid at MPS ( I have made it clear to the school that I'm upper) and how do I bring that up at interview?

    Thanks
     
  2. JohnJCazorla

    JohnJCazorla Star commenter

    My view is that you don't mention it at interview, even to the extent of refusing to answer if asked.
    "Shouldn't we discuss the pay when you decide if you want me?"

    The optimum time is to bring it up when offered the job, preferably when all other candidates have left the building. Even then you'd need a strong argument to present when asked, "We advertised it as Mainscale, you attended the interview knowing this, what has changed?"

    The true (but unsaid) answer to this is.... "I've seen the other candidates and the rest of the department and you are clearly desperate to have me or go down the plughole."

    Essentially all this is negotiation. A friend of mine is in business-to-business sales and I've often bought him a few beers and run through various scenarios before interviews. He knows nothing about education but everything about BS in negotiations which is all that matters. Do you have a similar friend to bribe with biccies/beer/bratwurst..... ?
     
  3. JohnJCazorla

    JohnJCazorla Star commenter

    To be pedantic, as it will be in the haggling, supply rates are neither here nor there. Agencies pay what they feel like. But if you can command a daily rate around £180-£200 then you must be pretty good at bargaining anyway.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  4. ViolaClef

    ViolaClef Lead commenter

    Agree with @JohnJCazorla. Don’t lay your cards on the table or negotiate at the interview stage. The interview is about securing the job, showing you are the best candidate - the most flexible, confident, experienced etc.
    When you are actually offered the job, you know where you stand and you can then play your cards from a strong hand. You knew the job was advertised at MPS, but equally they could see from your application that you are UPS. Negotiation is surely to be expected. If they want you badly enough they will pay you properly. If the pay offer is not what you want, you are not obliged to accept the job.
     
    agathamorse and JohnJCazorla like this.
  5. sooooexcited

    sooooexcited Established commenter

    Sorry but if the job is advertised as MPS and you apply for it knowing this, you'll be paid MPS.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  6. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    I disagree. I am also at the top of the scale (by which I mean my last perm job was on UPS3 and I refuse to work for less on supply). The last time I went mad and applied for a perm job, I simply emailed them first and asked if they were only offering up to M6 or whether UPS teachers could apply. Most of the schools replied they would consider UPS / MPS just meant not leadership. The couple that huffed I could then ignore. Applications are a non trivial time investment, I wouldn't waste my time unless I heard up front that they would meet my pay requirements.
    Teachers need to get tougher on schools. We are increasingly valuable and hard to find. In a marketplace, that makes us expensive.
     
    JohnJCazorla and ViciousChicken like this.
  7. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter


    Err no. The school don't tell you what you accept. You have to both agree. It's true that you are less likely to get UPS out of a school that advertised at MPS.
    Why are we as a group so poor at standing up for ourselves?!
     

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