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I'm not asking "challenging" questions

Discussion in 'English' started by sebedina, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. sebedina

    sebedina Occasional commenter

    I had an unofficial observation by a consultant who told me that I am not asking challenging enough questions in class q and as as my feedback. (Although I was asking questions etc)
    Are there any "tried and tested" questioning methods that I can look up anywhere or read up "how to develop the challenge in my classes?"
    The school is trying to be turned around as its a new school from previously being in special measures, so they are putting us all under microscope and every single lesson has to be challenging.
    Any tips or ideas would be great to show APP in observations and challenge.



     
  2. sebedina

    sebedina Occasional commenter

    I had an unofficial observation by a consultant who told me that I am not asking challenging enough questions in class q and as as my feedback. (Although I was asking questions etc)
    Are there any "tried and tested" questioning methods that I can look up anywhere or read up "how to develop the challenge in my classes?"
    The school is trying to be turned around as its a new school from previously being in special measures, so they are putting us all under microscope and every single lesson has to be challenging.
    Any tips or ideas would be great to show APP in observations and challenge.



     
  3. Bloom's taxonomy is your starting point and then there are resources out there with laminated fans which show the different types of questions - from basic understanding to analysing and using the text in different ways - but I don't have links. I'm sure someone will!
     
  4. thequillguy

    thequillguy New commenter

    Great resources directed to there by Airy. I think that the kind of challenging questioning to which your colleague might be referring would require:

    a) Thinking time on the part of the pupils. Think/Pair/Share. You can't ask an evaluative question and expect anyone to immediately give a reasoned answer. Therefore, the few seconds of silence needed to answer it will any skill will feel like a chasm to most.
    b) In response to the first point, it also requires some thinking out loud, with your facilitation, of the implications of the question. If the students need it, a list of phrases to indicate modality and connecting their ideas to those made before would be useful.

    If the students are not used to this way of learning/behaving across the school (and if the school has been in special measures, this may/may not be the case) then I imagine managing them to do so can be a little tricky. But worth it. Let us know how it goes.
     
  5. That's why I was thinking of those fans. You can give them to the pupils and get them to firstly identify what kind of questions you are asking and then think about how to go about answering. You could do a whole lesson to introduce it (the kind of thing inspectors love as you're teaching how to learn and how to discuss their learning) and get the concepts clear and then use it regularly in your questioning thereafter.
     

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