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I'm just a student who can't (can) say 'no'

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by slimcat, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. Would appreciate ideas. I have a student who, whatever you ask them, always responds 'no'/ 'I don't know'?
    E.g. 'Do you recognise this symbol?'
    'Can you pick up your file?'
    'Do you know what the answer is/What's the answer to...'
    Should explain; I'm working 1:1 - I wouldn't put them on the spot in front of a class.
    I've asked advice from teachers who have been working with them - they've said that partly it's the student's learning difficulties and partly, frankly, the student is a bit lazy and needs pushing. The thing is, the more I push at the moment, the more they are pushing back - I think it's turning into a power struggle which is obviously not helpful.
    The situation isn't helped because in the context I'm working in, I'm not given information about specific problems. The organisation's philosophy is that diagnoses can often be incorrect/we're all on a spectrum anyway/we need to get to know the student.
    Any ideas, anyone?
     
  2. Would appreciate ideas. I have a student who, whatever you ask them, always responds 'no'/ 'I don't know'?
    E.g. 'Do you recognise this symbol?'
    'Can you pick up your file?'
    'Do you know what the answer is/What's the answer to...'
    Should explain; I'm working 1:1 - I wouldn't put them on the spot in front of a class.
    I've asked advice from teachers who have been working with them - they've said that partly it's the student's learning difficulties and partly, frankly, the student is a bit lazy and needs pushing. The thing is, the more I push at the moment, the more they are pushing back - I think it's turning into a power struggle which is obviously not helpful.
    The situation isn't helped because in the context I'm working in, I'm not given information about specific problems. The organisation's philosophy is that diagnoses can often be incorrect/we're all on a spectrum anyway/we need to get to know the student.
    Any ideas, anyone?
     
  3. How about turning the questions into instructions?
    'Pick up your file'
    or structuring the answers 'This is the symbol for...'
    I have a student who also constantly responds 'don't know'. I think it's because he doesn't want to be seen as getting things wrong, coupled with the reinforcement at home that responding 'don't know' gets him out of thinking about whatever it was. Like your student, he DOES know, but the initial response has become almost automatic.
     
  4. Oh God, why didn't I think of that - it's so simple but I'm sure will help. Thank you...
     
  5. Don't ask questions that have yes or no answers.
    Get rid of "Can you?" for example .... Not "Can you show me the symbol for..." but "Show me the symbol for..."
     

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